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Movie Date: Getting 'Highness'

Friday, April 08, 2011 - 03:17 PM

Danny McBride in 'Your Highness' Danny McBride in "Your Highness" (Universal Pictures)

What's worse? Jokes about farts or boobs? Are there certain subjects that should be off limits for humor? And when does a movie cross the line from raunchy to completely tasteless? Rafer and Kristen debate these questions and share their opinions on the medieval raunch fest "Your Highness."

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Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer

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Comments [1]

Bowerygals from nyc

Wow. Really?
What makes something funny (that involves an already targeted group) is whether or not the person or group being made fun of is in the power position.

The question to ask? Is it the historically oppressed group or the historically oppressor group being made fun of?

That's why Colbert can tackle almost anything and be funny.

Otherwise you fall back on the racist, sexist, homophobic, disabled people, etc.
jokes that rely on targeting people who already have societies foot on their neck.
Hence, not different than any regular old bigot's jokes even if you think you are "above" such things.

People might laugh but it's not the hearty, belly laugh kind, it's the tight fear kind (that people need to do but better done in an understood context of people trying to work off our racism, sexism, homophobia, etc.). We do this all the time with close friends who understand where we actually sit on those issues.

Rape jokes sell because belittling women by making fun of every part of our
oppression is part of the oppression itself. So it's okay to make fun of a woman being
raped because not even one of the most pervasive and damaging tools used to keep women terrorized is to be taken seriously. And if we object- we are told we have no sense of "humor".

Apr. 10 2011 10:39 AM

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