How Middle East Revolutionaries Would View a Shutdown

Friday, April 08, 2011

Egyptian anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square and demonstrators protest in the capitol rotunda in Madison, Wisconsin. Egyptian anti-government demonstrators in Tahrir Square and demonstrators protest in the capitol rotunda in Madison, Wisconsin. (Pedro Ugarte/AFP/Scott Olson/Getty)

Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times and Mina al Oraibi, Washington D.C. Bureau Chief for the Arab-language newspaper Asharq al Awsat talk about the view of the U.S. government shutdown from the Arab world. As revolutions have spread throughout the Middle East this year, American politicians have had a lot to say about the importance of democracy in the region. But today, as the U.S. government teeters on the brink of a shutdown, do these words ring hollow to Arab revolutionaries? What would a shutdown look like to the countries fighting for democracy in the Middle East?

Guests:

Nicholas Kristof and Mina al Oraibi

Produced by:

Arwa Gunja and Jillian Weinberger

Comments [1]

listener

One year ago when Democrats controlled Congress, the Senate and The White House and refused to pass a budget, forcing through health care legislation and adding trillions in spending despite the public outcry, was that autocratic and extreme? Now Congress members elected during the mid-terms because of that public outcry are actually doing what they were elected to do like cut the massive debt. Is that autocratic or following the will of the voters?
A prolonged US government shutdown when many basic services and civil liberties would continue, would be vastly better than one day with the tyrants and "revolutionaries" abroad.
Of course this all could have been avoided if a Democrat Congress led by a Democrat President did their duty in our republic and passed a budget last year. It is worth remembering that as we engage in all the fatuous political histrionics this week.

Apr. 08 2011 08:45 AM

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