Getting Medical Help to Haiti

Thursday, January 21, 2010

The USNS Comfort has steamed into a sea of misery in Haiti. The floating hospital has a thousand beds, which is a big number, but is nothing compared to what's needed in Haiti right now. The worry this morning is will injured people, who would otherwise survive, die for lack of basic medical care. We find out about the status of the medical care there.

Dr. Arthur M. Fournier is an associate dean for community health affairs for the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Miami Leonard Miller School of Medicine, and he just got back from Haiti where he had a first-hand experience helping the people there medically. We also hear tape from The BBC, which has reporters on the ground in Haiti.

“People are lying on wooden pallets, usually used for stacking goods up instead of beds. We’ve also ran out of beds here.  There are patients with some very severe trauma injuries to the head, broken hands, broken legs. They’re all being treated by the doctors here, but the operating table is literally a wooden table with some clean paper, surgical paper put over it and stuck down with cella tape.”

--A BBC reporter on the ground in Haiti

Guests:

Dr. Arthur M. Fournier

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

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