What Kind of Aid Does Japan Really Need?

Thursday, March 24, 2011

More than 600 nonprofits have offered relief goods and materials to the people of Japan since the earthquake and tsunami. But with the exception of twelve countries with specialized search and rescue teams and a handful of international aid organizations, the Japanese government is politely turning them down. The Japanese Red Cross Society has yet to appeal for funds. Still, just like after every major natural disaster, dozens if not hundreds of new nonprofits have been registered. In the case of a major world economy like Japan, where and how does it make sense to give? 

Saundra Schimmelpfennig, author of the blog Good Intentions Are Not Enough says that donors should sponsor local Japanese nonprofits instead of starting their own — and give to charities without earmarking funds for Japan. 

Guests:

Saundra Schimmelpfennig

Produced by:

Kateri A. Jochum

Comments [5]

sayeed bin ahmmad from dhaka, bangladesh

i am sayeed from bangladesh. i want to help japan and want to stand with them in this moment. i can send pure drinking water to japan a large quantity. but i don't know the process to send. please if anyone help me just let me know.

we all people should stand with japanese people. and prove that we are human. live for each other.

Mar. 25 2011 01:54 AM
sayeed bin ahmmad from dhaka, bangladesh

i am sayeed from bangladesh. i want to help japan and want to stand with them in this moment. i can send pure drinking water to japan a large quantity. but i don't know the process to send. please if anyone help me just let me know.

we all people should stand with japanese people. and prove that we are human. live for each other.

Mar. 25 2011 01:51 AM
Mica

I am Japanese and I am very thankful that many people are helping my country. Even though the Japanese government has not appealed for assistance, it does not mean Japanese people do not need help. The government turned down aids from other countries due to "political reasons" when Hanshin earthquake occurred in 1995. As a result, many people died because the government was not equipped and quick enough to rescue people.

Japanese Red Cross Society is asking people to donate continuously, so it is not true that they have not appealed for funds.

Currently over 20,000 people are missing/dead and 25,000 people are evacuated. Many people lost everything.... Please keep supporting and praying for Japan. We are very grateful for support from many countries.

Mar. 24 2011 10:28 PM
Max G. Mahaffee from Johns Island, SC

The Sunday after the horrific events in Japan, I earmarked an extra amount of money that I gave to my United Methodist Church. The earmark was for UMCOR (www.umcor.org), the United Methodist Committee on Relief. It is my understanding that there are already (pre-earthquake, etc) UMCOR people in Japan and thus "on the ground" ready to help.

Be careful when giving as some charities might need to spend your money on getting to the area, renting a place from which to assist the locals, etc. That was not needed with UMCOR.

Mar. 24 2011 12:03 PM
Dan Henderson

Last year I was working aboard a private charter boat in the Caribbean which responded to the earthquake in Haiti. Our main mission was to act as a floating hotel for a non-profit relief group (Alaskan Structures) which was supposedly there to build temporary hospitals and tent shelter for the victims of the quake. It became clear after two days that the group was solely in Haiti to film their "efforts" and use them as promotional videos to try and get government funding.

This was entirely depressing to myself and our entire crew who were excited about having the opportunity to help people in need after a disaster only to find out that we were stuck with a self promoting company who was there to take advantage of other peoples suffering.

P.S.
This is the extremely dumbed down version of what I experienced with the company, I'd be happy to provide more detail if your interested.

Mar. 24 2011 08:01 AM

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