Wednesday's Show

Tuesday, January 19, 2010 - 11:06 AM

Adam, here, after the morning's editorial meetings.  We're looking at two main stories tomorrow: ongoing Haiti coverage, and the results of the Massachusetts election.

For Haiti, after a week of hearing compelling stories about the difficulties of getting aid to where it's needed, we're looking to either zoom out and try to get a handle on the larger relief picture with international moves to forgive Haiti's debts, or a closer look at just-surfacing aspects of the situation.  We had some conversation in the morning meeting about the staggering number of orphaned children in Haiti even before the earthquake, and how organizations are disagreeing about how to best help them now... We'll be making calls on both stories this afternoon.

The results of Massachusetts' election will be a big topic tomorrow no matter which way they go: either a startling win for conservative Republican Scott Brown in a very blue state, or a much-narrower-than-expected victory for Democrat Martha Coakely, who as recently as a couple of weeks ago was still considered a shoo-in for the late Sen. Ted Kennedy's seat.  We'll be talking with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, and likely some people on the ground in Massachusetts.

Tomorrow marks a year since President Obama's inauguration, and we'll be asking people on the National Mall in D.C. and around the country what their take on Obama is today, and what they'll be looking for from him in the next year.  We also expect to be talking with our friend, New York Times food writer Melissa Clark, and food author Marion Nestle about salt: how it affects us, moves to reduce it, and why it makes things taste so darned good.  'Eat, Pray, Love' author Elizabeth Gilbert plans to join us to talk about her recent book on marriage: 'Committed.'

That's how things look at midday, at least. Keep your eyes on the headlines today: We will be.

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