What Should The US Do About Libya?

Thursday, March 10, 2011

A Libyan rebel fighter mans a check point in the stronghold oil town of Ras Lanuf on March 5, 2011 where up to 10 people were killed and more than 20 wounded. A Libyan rebel fighter mans a check point in the stronghold oil town of Ras Lanuf on March 5, 2011 where up to 10 people were killed and more than 20 wounded. (AFP/Getty images)

In the past week, the world has watched as Libyan leader Col. Moammar Gadhafi's forces pound the opposition with gunfire and artillery from the skies. But despite intense deliberation at the White House and elsewhere, neither the U.S., NATO or others have been able to decide on a plan for intervention. Is Libya of national interest to the U.S.? And is it worth a potentially complex, long-term commitment? If not a no-fly zone: what should the United States do about Libya?

Joining us to answer that question are three men with different perspectives: Dirk Vandewelle, professor of government at Dartmouth University and author of “A History of Modern Libya,” retired Air Force Col. Sam Gardiner and Munsis El Buri, a political dissident from Libya now living in the U.S.

Guests:

Munsi El Buri, Col. Sam Gardiner and Dirk Vandewalle

Produced by:

Noel King

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