Earthquake Ravages Haiti

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Haitians run past damaged buildings in Port-au-Prince (AFP/Getty Images/Getty)

A powerful earthquake tore through Haiti Tuesday night, leaving devastation in its wake. The dead and injured lay in the streets even as strong aftershocks continued in what was the biggest quake to hit Haiti in more than 200 years.

A 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti's capital yesterday, the most powerful quake to hit Haiti in more than 200 years. Tens of thousands of people have lost their homes, countless have perished, and many of the normally flimsy and dangerous buildings in Haiti lay in ruins. For the latest on the story, we talk with Jacqueline Charles, a reporter with the Miami Herald, Laurent Dubois, a professor at Duke University, and Franz Neptune, who drives a car for the Haiti Foundation Against Poverty in Port-au-Prince, about the devastation and what this means for the Caribbean nation.

Guests:

Jacqueline Charles, Laurent Dubois and France Neptune

Comments [3]

Anon

tammy, your comment about using plaster from rubble to set broken bones is quite possibly the most idiotic statement I've ever read.

Jan. 17 2010 10:08 AM
tammy from california

After watching the doctors say they needed plaster to set broken bones. why can't they use the plaster from the crushed buildings, grind the plaster into powder with water to make cast for the survivors.

someone need to organize the people to help remove the debri out of the streets so the food trucks can get through. some one need to tell the people the food and water is there and they need their help to get the supplys to them.

I believe they need to get the people involved. so they feel they are helping themselfs.

Give them back their power and their wiil to live..

My heart hurts for my people.sending love to all around the world

Jan. 15 2010 05:05 PM
Personnel One from EVANSVILLE IN

i hope u feel ok i will be seeding u food ok i love u okkkk lol we are coming sooning

Jan. 13 2010 04:55 PM

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