Wisconsin Senate to Convene Without Democrats

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Protesters rally outside the Wisconsin State Capitol on February 21, 2011 in Madison, Wisconsin. (Eric Thayer/Getty)

In a press conference held Monday evening, Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker said that it was time to move forward on a budget repair bill currently stalled by the absence of the state’s fourteen Democratic state senators. The senators fled Wisconsin seven days ago in hopes of stalling a bill which, they say, hurts the middle and working class by stripping unions of the right to collectively bargain for benefits. With 19 seats, Republicans can pass the budget bill; without 20 sitting members, the Senate can't vote on spending measures.

Later today, the Wisconsin State Senate will convene to pass “non-spending” bills and act on several appointments, with or without the presence of those senators.  If the Senate finds a way to convene without its Democratic counterparts, what will they vote on, and will it essentially force this seven day stand-off to a close?  

For the answer, we speak to Wis. State Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald.

Guests:

Senator Scott Fitzgerald and Shawn Johnson

Produced by:

Hsi-Chang Lin

Comments [1]

Kathleen from New Jersey

Whether Wisconsin or Indiana, the governor is NOT the boss of the legislators. The people are their boss.

I would like to know why someone has not started the recall process to remove Walker from office. As I understand it, he gave tax cuts last year and that's why the budget is in the condition it's in.

Yes, we have our own cross, er, governor to bear in NJ. I don't know if we have the right of recall in NJ.

Feb. 24 2011 08:54 AM

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