State Dept's PJ Crowley on US Mid-East Foreign Policy

Friday, February 18, 2011

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives to give a press briefing at the State Department in Washington, DC, on November 29, 2010. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrives to give a press briefing at the State Department in Washington, DC, on November 29, 2010. (Getty Images)

Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen, Libya: Friend or foe? That question is getting harder to answer, as crackdowns on protests in the Middle East by U.S. allied governments blur the lines. Just in December, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton praised Bahrain for its progress on the road to democracy. Today, the State Department reaped criticism for their weak stance against the police violence that has left at least six dead. But how will the U.S. realign itself, should Shiite protestors topple the government in Bahrain — a strategic partner that guarantees military access to the region? And what about Yemen, an ally against terrorist forces in the region? What will the new U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East look like after the wave of change is over?

Joining us is PJ Crowley, United States Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs.

Guests:

P.J. Crowley

Produced by:

Kateri A. Jochum

Comments [1]

Randy from Idaho

This SD secretary appeared on NWCN the day the sailors from the US’ west coast were killed by their captors - Somali pirates. Before Crowley [apparently] knew the camera and microphone were focused and audible at the podium, he was smirking, joking, chuckling and/or laughing just prior to announcing the sailors’ killings along with other world news items - deplorable and disgusting. Once he began speaking to the public, he ditched his overt jocularity and quickly became somber as best he could. Who does he think he was fooling was my first question. I looked around the ‘net to see if anyone else picked up on this - not devoting an extensive amount of my time towards this - not finding similar notations or clips

Feb. 28 2011 06:41 PM

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