This Week's Agenda: Middle East, Budget, G20 Summit

Monday, February 14, 2011

With protesters in Egypt successfully overthrowing President Hosni Mubarak, following successful protests in Tunisia, we take a look at Yemen. That country has seen protests all weekend — not from the opposition but from the youth of the country, who have organized primarily via text messaging. Noel King, managing producer for The Takeaway, looks at why the U.S. should be keeping a close eye on what's happening in Yemen, as well as in Iran. 

Back in the U.S., President Obama is set to give in his budget proposal for 2012 to Congress. This is bound to lead to a very acrimonious few weeks and months in Washington between Democrats and Republicans, according to Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC Radio. The 2012 budget is being proposed even with last year's budget still not permanently funded by Congress.

And the G20 Summit is set to start this week — but there are those who believe this summit is just a waste of time and doesn't accomplish anything.

Guests:

Charlie Herman and Noel King

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [1]

JOHN F MEAGHER from Rowayton Ct

The federal budget will soon become a political football and part of the Dem strategy to reelectObama if Cong. Nadler's comments are any indication, This is not the time to demonize the republicans. How does he expect a second stimulus to work when the first was a flop.

Where was the discussion to lower the corporate tax rate ?

and... the need to remove unnecessary job killing federal regulations

and ... what happened to tort reform and capping excessive awards that are killing growth and sending docs out of the profession ?

In conclusion, we have one of the most unfriendly environments for growing our economic base and if we don't take immediate action in this congress,China will be sending aid to us.


Feb. 15 2011 12:11 PM

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