Books: The Revolution Will Be Written

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Citizens have protested in Tunisia. There are threats of an uprising in Jordan. And it's day seventeen of public demonstrations against the government in Egypt.

Revolution is sweeping across northern Africa and the Middle East, and, in recognition of these revolutions, Patrik Henry Bass, senior editor at Essence Magazine, shares his favorite revolutionary books.

Patrik's Favorite Revolutionary Books

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Contributors:

Patrik Henry Bass

Comments [4]

Dennis Seager from Oklahoma State University

For another take on "revolution" in literature, look at two works of the famous Cuban novelist, Alejo Carpentier. His "The Kingdom of this World" suggests how the Haitian revolution was possible and his "Explosion in a Cathedral" shows how the French Revolution impacted the Caribbean.

Feb. 10 2011 05:22 PM
Jim Nichols

Your link for Motorcycle Diaries is wrong. The ISBN of the US paperback edition of Motorcycle Diaries is: 9781876175702.

Feb. 10 2011 10:09 AM

@Andrew Horn
Thank you for your observations. We will make the corrections to the audio, which will be archived on this page.

Feb. 10 2011 07:36 AM
Andrew Horn from Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

* Ngugi wa Thiong'o is Kenyan, not Nigerian.
* He is not banned from returning to Kenya, but choses to stay in the US for his own personal safety.
* To claim he is Nigerian is tantamount to calling Kafka a Brazilian or Proust a Kazakh.
* We must be more careful when talking about the widely varied nations and cultures of the vast continent of Africa.

Feb. 10 2011 07:01 AM

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