Best (and Worst) Super Bowl Commercials

Monday, February 07, 2011

Most of us prefer to fast-forward through TV commercials in our everyday lives. But on Super Bowl Sunday, the ads are almost as hyped as the game itself.

Featuring celebrity endorsements, special effects, and the kind of humor that pushes the envelope, Super Bowl ads have the potential to become iconic, and our digital age, viral. Not surprisingly, this also means the price of a commercial is high. For this past weekend’s game, companies paid approximately three million dollars per thirty second spot. (Check out some of the ads after the jump.)

But were this weekend’s ads any good? Here to give us a filmic assessment of the ads is our movie date podcast team: Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, and Takeaway producer Kristen Meinzer.

Want to subscribe to Movie Date? It's easy on the Movie Date iTunes page.

CareerBuilder.com: "Parking Lot"


Doritos: "Best Part"


Chevrolet: "'Transformers' Bumblebee"


GoDaddy.com: "GoDaddy.co Girl"


Volkswagen: "The Force"


Contributors:

Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer

Comments [8]

I was eagerly awaiting Monday's comments on the SuperBowl commercials, and astounded that what appeared to be shockingly distasteful to me was not even mentioned. what's with the violence against women,,,and now children? Physical comedy has always been "funny" when performed by the Stooges or Chaplin. Even Lucille Ball partook in hilarious episodes, but they were self-inflicted, and not physically harmful. Sunday, women were hit in the head with soda cans (did you count how many cans flew thru the air that evening?), flattened by a swinging log, and.....how funny is it to see a baby smash into a window? Has our rampant incivility numbed us to attacks on even the most innocent of us?

Feb. 11 2011 10:45 AM
Jorge V from Texas

Best commercial, and one you did not mention on your show. Younger kids "got it" before the adults. actuall, adults did not get it.
The Detroit/Chrysler commercail. The kids quickly realized the words came form a very famous Eminem song. It was a powerful commercial, classy, and quite a change for Chrysler to use Eminem to target an audience.
well done

Feb. 07 2011 10:22 AM
Shaun Nethercott from Detroit

I was surprised that no one has mentioned the Eminem/Chrysler 200/"Imported from Detroit" ad. At the neighborhood bar in Detroit, where we watched the Super Bowl, people cheered the ad. I cheered the ad.

Afterwards, comments about it were all over Facebook and Twitter.

Was that a completely local response.

Feb. 07 2011 09:43 AM
Jane from Pittsburgh

Maybe if Ms. Aguilera would have just sung the song in the melody in which it was written she would have remembered the words!!! Embellishment has become so prevalent that it just detracts from the beauty of the music.

I hope she didn't have the nerve to collect a paycheck for that pathetic performance.

Feb. 07 2011 09:43 AM
Marie from Brooklyn, NY

The Groupon commercial represented the worst in America- cultural insensitivity matched with mindless consumerism.

Feb. 07 2011 09:20 AM
Ann from West Bloomfield,MI

I loved Chrysler's "Imported from Detroit" ad, and am glad both Chrysler and Eminem were able to make the drive down from exurban Oakland County to make it.

Feb. 07 2011 08:47 AM

I was late to the SuperBowl party last night. After the usual formalities, my first question - repeated to a person by later arrivals - was not "what's the score," but "have they run the VW spot with the little kid?" We'd all seen it on YouTube (mostly on our phones), and were waiting to see it on a 70-inch plasma screen. Commercials are an inevitable annoyance. At least for one show a year, they're mostly watchable.

Feb. 07 2011 08:10 AM
Pearl from Mount Vernon, NY

The Groupon commercial was the worst and demonstrated a complete lack of taste and sensitivity. It was offensive in every sense of the word and once again showed American's disrespect for other cultures!

Feb. 07 2011 07:00 AM

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