Can US and China Share Military Goals?

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

A Secret Service agent guards his post on the roof of the White House as a lamp post is adorned with Chinese and US national flags in Washington, DC, on January 17, 2011. A Secret Service agent guards his post on the roof of the White House as a lamp post is adorned with Chinese and US national flags in Washington, DC, on January 17, 2011. (Getty Images)

On the heels of Defense Secretary Robert Gates' visit to China last week, President Barack Obama and President Hu Jintao will discuss the evolving relationship between each country's military this weeek. Gates urged the need for both countries to strengthen their military ties and keep one another informed about all their military capabilities. However, historically, China's military has been reluctant to take part in meetings with their U.S. counterparts.

There have also been doubts in recent days over whether President Hu Jintao is truly in charge of the military. In a positive move, the two countries are expected to announce billions of dollars in new contracts for Beijing to purchase US goods, including civilian aircrafts. Shen Dingli is a fellow at the Asia Society and director for the Center of American Studies at Fudan University in Shanghai. He helps to clarify the relationship between President Hu Jintao and his military.

Guests:

Shen Dingli

Produced by:

Arwa Gunja

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