In the Wake of Tucson Tragedy, Reflecting on the Media's Role in Fueling Vitriol

Friday, January 14, 2011

This has been a week of difficult coverage on The Takeaway. The deadly shooting in Tucson left us grappling with difficult questions – not only about the victims and their families, but also about gun control, mental illness, political discourse, extremism, the media and free speech – questions that cut to the very heart of Americans values. What can we learn from the Arizona shooting? How should we reflect on this terrible tragedy?

Joining us to unpack these questions is Time Magazine's Editor-at-Large David Von Drehle, author of "The Real Lesson of the Tucson Tragedy" in this week's issue.

Guests:

David Von Drehle

Produced by:

Jillian Weinberger

Comments [6]

Listerner from MI

If harassment is illegal, then blocking demonstrators with hurtful intent seems like that's in the spirit of the law to me.

Jan. 14 2011 09:18 AM
Listerner from FL

I believe the term 'freedom' is misused. To me it's an absolute. In turn we are granted a range to operate in.

Jan. 14 2011 09:17 AM
Listerner from MI

"Limits"? No. Imperfections? Absolutely.

Jan. 14 2011 09:13 AM
Listerner from CO

It shows that we are in bondage to our freedom. True freedom is knowing that you can do or say whatever u chose, but have the restraint to not to.

Jan. 14 2011 09:11 AM
Marissa Solomon from NY

No! A crazy murderer does NOT set the limits for ANYTHING! We should not base our freedoms based on the extremes of fear; if we do we will have no ...freedoms left.

Jan. 14 2011 09:09 AM
Jefrey Peltz from Brooklyn, NY

I just heard the John Hockenberry call Chris Matthews and Keith Olbermann a clown. Perhaps I would understand that about Keith OlbermannI take exception to Chris Matthews. I have found him to be far from a clown. In fact, I've found him to be a voice of common sense. Has he ever watched Chris Matthews for more than five minutes?

Jan. 14 2011 07:32 AM

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