JFK Library Goes Digital

Thursday, January 13, 2011

John Fitzgerald Kennedy (R) is sworn in as the 35th US president by Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren (L) in front of the Capitol in Washington on January 20, 1961. (STF/AFP/Getty)

The John F. Kennedy presidential archive goes digital today. It's a huge archive of everything that passed across the president's desk, including: the White House photo collection, all the Kennedy audio and video, and Kennedy family home movies. The holdings will no longer be filtered through journalists or historians, instead allowing the public first-hand access to history.

Tom Putnam, director of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum describes the process and importance of this digital archive. He shares the recording of a telephone conversation between Eisenhower and Kennedy, in which they discuss whether to attack Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Guests:

Tom Putnam

Comments [1]

Timothy D. Naegele from Malibu, CA

Kennedy was a fraud, pure and simple, as I have discussed in an article entitled, "John F. Kennedy: The Most Despicable President In American History."

See http://naegeleblog.wordpress.com/2010/10/04/john-f-kennedy-the-most-despicable-president-in-american-history/

The problem is that the Kennedy family members and sycophants have been burying the truth since his assassination, and it needs to be told. When he died, his “image” was frozen in time, but the truth is grotesque. To lionize him like his sycophants have done is a crime, and unconscionable.

The latest travesty is Caroline Kennedy's successful distortion of the truth by forcing the History Channel to drop its already-completed min-series about Kennedy and his wife, starring Katie Holmes and Greg Kinnear.

Jan. 15 2011 03:30 PM

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