A New Year, or Same Old Sludge for the Gulf Coast?

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

worker cleans tarballs from the BP oil spill on Waveland beach December 6, 2010 in Waveland, Mississippi. Nearly eight months after the spill, tarballs are still washing up on the beach. (Mario Tama/Getty)

All week long we're talking with some of our favorite guests from the past year about the year that was, and what they foresee in the year ahead.

Today: a conversation about the largest accidental marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry…the BP spill in the Gulf of Mexico, which leaked over 205 million gallons of crude oil into the Gulf this past spring and summer. The leaking oilhead was capped in July: how are people in Gulf states doing today?

 

Joining us is Dean Blanchard. Dean owns a wholesale seafood business in Louisiana, and has been on the show several times over the past year to share his story.

Captain Kathy Wilkinson is also back with us. She operates an eco-tourism business in southern Mississippi.

 

Guests:

Dean Blanchard and Captain Kathy Wilkinson

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer and Jen Poyant

Comments [2]

T Copp from toronto

Social media is changing our business world profoundly
Understand and use www.facebookyellowpages.com or risk becoming irrelevant in the business world
http://www.facebookyellowpages.com/index.php?section=contact&subsection=submit_your_free_listing
Facebook Yellow Pages is a growing company in the center of a quickly evolving landscape. Our goal is to foster the open exchange of information, as we believe this leads to positive things happening in the business world.
Regards
CS@facebookyellowpages.com

Dec. 29 2010 01:19 PM
Capt. Kathy Wilkinson from Gautier, MS

I just wanted to clarify a couple things. First of all, in terms of claims against BP, I imagine the claim I'm making for Eco-Tours of South Mississippi, LLC is relatively small. Additionally, I have documentation (sales tax returns, etc.) to support my claim which I understand many of the claimants do not have.

Secondly, the people who wear hazmat suits on the beach are the workers who clean up the tarballs. I didn't want to leave the impression that to go to the beach, one would be required to don a Tyvek suit. Certainly on my tours no Tyvek is required.

Thank you for your consideration.

Regards,
Capt. Kathy Wilkinson

Dec. 29 2010 01:16 PM

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