Serving Up Politics at the Holiday Dinner Table

Thursday, December 23, 2010

When families get together for the holidays, there's bound to be tons of food, drink and cheer. But a slice of political debate often comes along with the green beans. Talking politics may be a no-go for a cocktail party, but for lots of families it's a holiday staple. Tax cuts, health care, the Tea Party: Which topics will be the hot potatoes of this year's festivities?

Justin and Jason Winbolt, brothers living in different states and on opposite sides of the political spectrum, give us their Christmas menu of political sibling rivalry. Justin listens on Takeaway affiliate station, KOSU in Oklahoma and texted us yesterday.

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Guests:

Jason Winbolt and Justin Winbolt

Produced by:

Kateri A. Jochum

Comments [3]

Earline from Perry, OK

Pres. Obama does not take all the credit for the passage of bills this lame duck session! He said only yesterday that he didn't; and, that the passages were accomplished because of the American people.

Dec. 23 2010 11:28 AM
RaEllen Woods from Oklahoma

Thankfully you got the very mild version of the political arguments that happen at Winbolt gatherings. As much as Mom does dim them down as soon as Dad is outside of ear-shot they start up and the brothers do get pretty riled up. That being said even Mom gets involved if Dad can't hear especially when the topic is health care seeing that she is a nurse. I love our family very much but getting together is always interesting and sparks even more interesting conversations. Guess I should mention I am Justin Winbolt's fiance. Thank you for having them on the show.

Dec. 23 2010 10:37 AM
Matt Laurence from Boston, MA

My FAVORITE holiday jazz album is Django Bells by the Gypsy Hombres... the best!

Dec. 23 2010 09:54 AM

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