Your Holiday Music Picks: The Good, The Bad, and The Barking Song

Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 01:17 PM

It was wafting through pharmacies, gas stations and shopping malls as soon as Halloween was over, and love it or hate it, it won't be going away until all the figgy pudding is consumed and the presents opened. That's right; we're talking about holiday music.

Luckily, there's an impressive spectrum of the stuff performed by a plethora of performers: From Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra, to James Brown, Ella Fitzgerald, The Ramones, The Ronnettes, and even a wizzened Bob Dylan and an exhuberant Stephen Colbert. Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly have done "The Little Drummer Boy," and Run-DMC had a hit with "Christmas in Hollis." 

We've been asking people to Remix the Holidays all week, and that includes listeners. Specifically we've been asking for your favorite and least-favorite holiday music. 

You've had plenty to say on all sides of the issue. Here are some more of your responses, via text, phone, and web.

Greg called from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. with this classic warm-weather Christmas cut:

My favorite Christmas song is "Mele Kalikimaka" from Bing Crosby and the Andrews Sisters. It's a great song and it's fun to sing. Mele Kalikimaka!
Another caller from Florida had a more irreverent pick and sent it in via text:
I love the country song "You ain't gettin' s*** for Christmas."
Gloria from York, Pa., offered up her favorite:

My all-time favorite Christmas song, it's John Lennnon's "And so this Christmas" I'm not sure how that title goes [actual title "Merry Chrismas (War is Over)"], but that's the one that I really love. Thank you and Merry Christmas for everyone....

Of course, there were some holiday music haters, as there always are, annd we wanted to give them a voice as well.

Wallace Graham in Brighton Beach, N.Y., called in with this:

The Christmas song I cannot stand to hear is "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus." That kid's shrill voice hurts you teeth. Hurts you fillings. Terrible.

John from Gross Pointe, Mich. had this to say:

How could you people possibly have forgotten the barking dogs? You know, woof woof woof, woof woof woof, woof woof woof woof woof. A close second is Eartha Kitt's "Santa Baby," which of course is about a kept woman badgerin her sugar daddy for endless amount of gifts. You know, it's a race to the bottom for those two....

Justin Winbolt, of Enid, Okla., had a more contemplative idea for celebrating with "holiday music," sent in via text:

"Silent Night," and there be no music or lyrics. What a peaceful way to celebrate the season.

Finally on Facebook, Tom Prior of Brooklyn offered perhaps my favorite option...listen below:

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Comments [4]

timmie from miami beach

Christmas just wouldn't be Christmas without listening to Truckstop Honeymoon's song, "Christmas in Ocala". It's just perfect!

Dec. 22 2010 07:40 PM
Peg Mallett from Wayland, MA

It wouldn't be Christmas without several airings of Gian Carlo Menotti's "Amahl and the Night Visitors" - the first opera to be commissioned for television (!) and first broadcast on Christmas Eve 1951 - 5 million people tuned in to see the first ever "The Hallmark Hall of Fame" program. This clip is from 1955 version, starring original cast member Rosemary Kuhlman, with Amahl played by Bill McIver.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_03iA_QvfWw&feature=channel

Dec. 22 2010 07:05 PM
Jim from Mechanicsburg, PA

I LOVE "Santa Baby", especially Madonna's version. It's so obviously tongue in cheek. Did you know she did it for a charity album?

Dec. 21 2010 08:33 PM
Jonpaul from Grosse Pointe Woods MI

One that gets my attention

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-DV1nI--d4

"Christmas in Hollis" I remember it from the original Die Hard Movie.

Dec. 21 2010 08:26 PM

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