This Week's Agenda: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell,' Repeal, START Agreement, Net Neutrality

Monday, December 20, 2010

The Senate voted to repeal "don't ask, don't tell," over the weekend. The law, enacted 17 years ago by President Bill Clinton, allowed gays to serve in the military, as long as they did not reveal their sexual orientation. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, looks at what's next for the repeal. Meanwhile, a number of economic indicators come out this week, and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, looks at the upcoming third quarter GDP numbers due out Wednesday, along with existing home sales numbers, and new home sales numbers on Thursday.

Herman will also delve into the FCC's scheduled vote on Tuesday on a number of net neutrality rules, which could determine how the Internet is shaped and run by ISPs across the country.

Guests:

Charlie Herman and Todd Zwillich

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [1]

Chris from Miami, FL

The main problem with this idea is that although nobody has a problem with gays in the military, its the public conduct that is the problem. Regulations are going to have to be implemented to restrict soldiers from being transvestites & gender-bending "Today I'm Chris, tomorrow I'm Kristine" in Uniform and openly gay acts such as two men kissing in an establishment on base is going to erupt in a battle. The British military allows gays but do not allow open acts that are contradictory to the good order of the force or controversial and that is what we must do, because Americans DEMAND that they can do ANYTHING just because they havent been told that they cant.

Dec. 20 2010 09:47 AM

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