What's Wrong with the 2011 Golden Globes Nominations

Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 03:01 PM

Let’s make one thing clear. I’m not completely upset with the Hollywood Foreign Press Association about the 2011 Golden Globe nominations. Not completely.

Many actors I believe deserved nods received them: Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Julianne Moore, Annette Benning, Melissa Leo, Michelle Williams, and Ryan Gosling, to name just a few in the film categories; Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey, Laura Linney, and Jane Lynch, among others in the television categories.

Several films and TV shows that I think deserved nominations also received them: “The Kids are All Right,” “The King’s Speech,” “The Social Network," "Glee," and "30 Rock."

And I can not overstate how happy I am that Jennifer Love Hewitt is finally getting some recognition (I don’t care what anyone says; I loved Lifetime’s “The Client List”).

But here’s where I get riled up: “True Grit.” Why was it shut out? Easily one of the best movies of 2010 (if not the best movie of 2010), it received zero nominations for directing (the Coen brothers’ have made one of their best films here, as far as I'm concerned) or picture (how often does an audience stay through the whole credits because they don’t want the film to end?). And why no acting nods? Yes, I understand ignoring little Hailee Steinfeld (she’s young, she has plenty more time to get nominations) and Josh Brolin (really, he’s only on screen for a few minutes). But what about Jeff Bridges? His acting in “True Grit” may be the best of his career, and it’s easily some of the best acting in any film this year.

Okay, I’ll stop now, lest I begin telling you at length how I feel about those “Burlesque” nominations.

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