Black, Biracial or Mixed?

Tuesday, December 14, 2010 - 01:59 PM

A new study says that biracial Americans of black and white ancestry are more often self-identifying as black. The study, published in the Social Psychology Quarterly, finds that the majority of black-white biracial adults surveyed said they called themselves black.

The authors of the study describe this phenomenon "reverse passing."

"Most notably, we find a striking reverse pattern of passing today—while passing during the Jim Crow era involved passing as white, these respondents more often report passing as black today."

Weigh in: If you are the son or daughter of mixed-race parents, or if your parents are of different religions, what do you call yourself? How has this changed over time?

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Comments [30]

Chanel from Washington

Woow, when I read this I thought someone gets me, but all I see are half and half postings of bring a true biracial. I don't wanna slam on everyone's party, but I think this post was really meant for people like myself! I'm light tan naturally, people call me yellow, you name it, but unlike everyone who posts, both my parents are considered black, now why am I so fkn light? My dad is mixed because his moms dad and mother were half and half, half white was her dad and half Asian was her mom. And the black part of her on her dads side is also biracial. My mom who is darker then I has a dad who is of multiracial heritage. He was half white or creole. Now people see me and my multiple black mixed hair textures and say I'm half in half, but I'm not and I tell them that. Unfortunately if one parent isn't one race and the other another i have more trouble than the biracial People who know they are black but no one can deny an whole half race parent! But for me, nooooo lol I love being black but I choose to acknowledge every part of me like beyonce. Black people call me sell out and whites while they acknowledge I'm mixed race, they prefer to just say black. I feel torn because they are all my ancestors, but come on lol, the your 1/4 white and 3/black think is stupid. No what's stupid is that people have to ask if that's considered mixed lol wtf umm duh! Even if your a quarter white. But all I see are biracial people stressing their pain and not one non biracial or half in half speaking up for who they are! Be proud of who you are and never let someone just give you a classification. And also you don't have to be my tone to be multiracial. Even if the mixture is through your grandparents and greatgrandparnts that's who you are, they are who your parents are. Not saying someone with a different half race shouldn't be writing on hear, but I'm more surprised by how many non half in half are not on this forum speaking as a proud black person who knows being mixed isn't just a term for biracial. Also I wrote a post on yahoo questions about who I am, every fkn black person called me ashamed of being black because the question was are you mixed even if both parents are black with multiracial ancestry. I already knew the answer but I can't believe how shallow we have become. It's bad enough by looking at me I can't hide being mixed, it's worse when you look mixed with two black parents, mixed grandparents. Your thought of as wanting to be less black like wtf? I wish my hair was more Afro textured for thickness, my hair isn't as thick, two my husbands white, though he understands, it's gonna be hard to help my kid understand who they are! I wouldn't want my kid no matter what color to ignore all their ancestry no matter how far down. I think all blacks should look into our multitude of cultures I our blood we know nothing about including africa

Jan. 28 2013 08:03 PM
AllPeople from USA

.
There is actually no such thing as a so-called "Light-Skinned
Black" person ... but rather ... such individuals and groups
are actually people who are of a 'Multi-Generational
Multiracially-Mixed' (MGM-Mixed) Lineage that some may
have been pressured or encouraged to ignore or downplay.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4160
.
People of Mixed-Race lineage should NOT feel pressured to
'identify' according to any standards other than one's own.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4157
.
The legal -application of the racist-'One-Drop Rule'
(ODR) was banned in the U.S. way back in 1967.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4162
.
http://www.facebook.com/groups/253286018082418/permalink/253341891410164
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4187
.
http://www.facebook.com/groups/253286018082418/permalink/253341281410225
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
Listed below are related Links of 'the facts' of the histories
of various Mixed-Race populations found within the U.S.:
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
There is no proof that a 'color-based slave hierarchy'
(or that 'color-based social-networks') ever existed
as common entities -- within the continental U.S.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4154
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4153
.
It was the 'Rule of Matriliny (ROM) -- [a.k.a. 'The Rule of Partus'
(ROP)] -- and NOT the racist-'One-Drop Rule' (ODR) -- that was
used to 'create more enslaved people' on the continental U.S.
.
This is because the chattel-slavery system that was
once found on the antebellum-era, continental U.S.
was NOT "color-based" (i.e. "racial") -- but rather
-- it was actually "mother-based" (i.e. 'matrilineal').
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/309460495741441
.
There were many ways (and not solely the sexual assault
and sexual exploitation of the women-of-color) in which
'white' lineage entered the familial bloodlines of
enslaved-people found on the continental U.S.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4238
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4239
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4240
.
An 'Ethnic' category is NOT the
same thing as a "Race" category:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4236
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/300777016632181
.
Other Topics:
.
https://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/279223868853420
.
https://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/164203590359746
.
http://www.facebook.com/notes/%C2%ADallpeople-gifts/the-facts-on-m%C2%ADixed-race/321878451159708
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.

Nov. 24 2012 10:37 PM
AllPeople from USA

.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
--- There's No such thing as a "light-skinned black" person
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4160

http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/309460495741441
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/279341645455647
.
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4157
.
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/300777016632181
,
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/279341645455647
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
‎-- The Black-And-White-World of 'Walter Plecker' & 'Naomi Drake'
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4179
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4180
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4186
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
-- How an act of 'Loving' destroyed a racist "rule"
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4162
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4187
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
More Links
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4152
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4153
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1034
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1032
.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
.

Jan. 02 2012 11:01 PM
AllPeople (AP) Mixed from http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed

.
.
Listed below are links to information on the topic
of the history of 'Race'; 'Mixed-Race', 'Interracial
Marriages / Relationships'' etc. found in the U.S.:
.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4162
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4160
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4157
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/309460495741441
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4152
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4153
.
http://www.facebook.com/allpeople.gifts/posts/272938769421484
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4180
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4179
.
http://www.facebook.com/notes/­allpeople-gifts/the-facts-on-m­ixed-race/321878451159708
.
.

Dec. 16 2011 10:15 PM
AllPeople from USA

Listed below are links to data
on the Historical MYTH of a
Color-Based / Slave-Role
HIERARCHY — as well
as the Urban LEGEND
of Paper-Bag, Blue-Vein
& Other Allegations of
Features-Based Entry ‘TESTS’:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4153
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4154
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2885
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2511
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400

ALSO, here is a brief COMMENTARY on
the constant misapplication of the racist
‘One-Drop Rule’ ** (to the people who are
of any part-Black / Mixed-Race Lineage):

[** PLEASE TAKE NOTE
OF THE FACT THAT :
The racist ‘one-drop’ “rule” was made
‘illegal’ in the U.S. in 1967 by the U.S.
Supreme Court via the ‘Loving vs. VA’
case (i.e. The ‘Loving’ case) – where
the U.S. Supreme Court ruled ...
--- 1) All ‘Anti-Miscegenation’
Laws found throughout the U.S.;
--- 2) The racist ‘VA Racial Integrity
Act’ (upon which most of the
anti-miscegenation ‘laws’ were founded);
&
--- 3) The ('black-lineage mocking' &
exceedingly) racist ‘One-Drop Rule’
(upon which the ‘Act’ was based.)
… as being ‘UN-Constitutional’
(i.e. illegal, banned, etc.).]
.
THE FACTS are as follows:

1) It is often a surprise for people to learn
that, in reality, there is actually No Such
Thing As a “Light Skinned Black” person.

2) Very few people seem to be aware
of the fact that the term “Light Skinned
Black” is really nothing more than a
racist oxymoron created by Racial
Supremacists in an effort to forcibly
deny those Mixed-Race individuals,
who are of a Multi-Generational
Multiracially-Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
lineage, the right to fully embrace
& to also receive public support in
choosing to acknowledge
the truth regarding their full
ancestral heritage & lineage.

3) The people who have been slapped with
the false label & oxymoronic misnomer of
“Light Skinned Black” person are simply
Mixed-Race individuals — who are from
families that have been CONTINUALLY
Mixed-Race THROUGHOUT
multiple generations.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4157
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3331
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2511
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1402
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1003
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3998
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4065
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3999
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400

SOURCE:
http://www.facebook.com/notes/allpeople-gifts/the-facts-on-mixed-race/321878451159708

Nov. 23 2011 11:40 AM
AllPeople from USA

.

THE FACTS are as follows:

1) It is often a surprise for people to learn that, in reality, there
is actually No Such Thing As a "Light Skinned Black" person.

2) Very few people seem to be aware of the fact that the term
"Light Skinned Black" is really nothing more than a racist
oxymoron created by Racial Supremacists in an effort to
forcibly deny those Mixed-Race individuals, who are of
a Multi-Generational Multiracially-Mixed (MGM-Mixed)
lineage, the right to fully embrace and to also received
public support in choosing to acknowledge the truth
regarding their full ancestral heritage and lineage.

3) The people who have been slapped with the false label and
oxymoronic misnomer of "Light Skinned Black" person are simply
Mixed-Race individuals -- who are from families that have been
CONTINUALLY Mixed-Race THROUGHOUT multiple generations.

4) Seeing that every other Mixed-Race group is allowed the dignity
of receiving support in having itself referred to by the term that
it most prefers – the question becomes “Why should the
situation be any different for those Mixed-Race
individuals who are of an Multi-Generational
Multiracially-Mixed (MGM-Mixed) lineage?”.

5) If an MGM-Mixed individual would like to be referred to by the
term ‘Mixed-Race’ (which is what they actually are) rather than by
that of “Light-Skinned Black“ (a term, which, once again, has the
racist-origin of being nothing more than an oxymoronic-phrase that
was both created and coined by Racial Supremacists in an effort to
try to deny these Mixed-Race people their right to and support in
publicly acknowledging and also embracing their FULL-Lineage)
there is no reason that they (like every other group on the planet
-- whether Mixed-Race or not) should not be allowed the right
to choose the term that society uses in referring to them
(and to have their full-lineage acknowledged within that term).

RELATED LINKS:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1399
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/2511
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1402
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1574
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1003
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3998
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4065
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/3999
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/1400
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4154
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed/message/4153

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

--- AllPeople (AP) Gifts
soaptalk@hotmail.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Generation-Mixed
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MGM-Mixed
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FGM-Mixed
http://www.youtube.com/user/APGifts

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

.


Nov. 19 2011 02:05 AM
joyce highsmith from Arkansas

My father was white, my mother is black with african,irish and native american decent. I am often ask what I am, what I am mixed with , my nationality and my response is I am female, mixed with mom and dad and I am an American,and I am my own United Nations....

Feb. 24 2011 01:09 AM
Chantal from Kansas

I am 18 and my mother is black and my father is white. Because of where I live, I am one of the few "black" people here. And well, I love it! It makes me happy to be both races. I always tell people that put me down because of it that I am the best of both worlds.

Jan. 18 2011 02:21 AM
robbi from East Harlem

I have a light almond complexion. My dad is white and my mom is black. People often mistake me for Italian or Hispanic, but I am and have always identified myself as black first. If people insist on knowing I tell them I am "mixed".

Once, this white women with an accent asked me, where do I come from? I said I was born and raised in Harlem. Her face changed and she said to me " you look like a French person with a tan."

Dec. 19 2010 11:49 AM
Catherine from Salt Lake City

I have light tan-olive skin and dark brown curly hair. When asked, I respond that "mom's white, dad's black" or simply, "mixed"; sometimes the answer is "I'm from Wisconsin", or "I'm American" depending upon how the question was asked.

My mom is white, blond and blue-eyed. My [late] father had medium-dark skin and identified as black, though he had one Choctaw great-grandparent and one white great-grandparent (no one, to my knowledge, ever asked him "what" he was)

Dec. 18 2010 12:47 AM
Lindsay from Phoenix

I refer to myself as "mixed" or simply "half black" when someone asks me what NATIONALITY I am... actually, first I say "I'm American, why? Do I speak with an accent? Oh you mean ETHNICITY?"

My mom is black and my dad is white. I have fair skin and "white" hair (my dads) which apparently I'm supposed to feel lucky to have according to some folks.

Dec. 17 2010 11:58 PM
Kenny from Detroit

I could write a book about this subject. As a product of a black man / white woman (I look more white/latino) adopted into a black family, my childhood was especially difficult. I've always identified myself as a black person, even though it was hard to explain because my adoptive mother wanted me to somehow keep a veil of secrecy over my background. Black people can tell where I'm from pretty much by the way I talk, while other races sometimes accuse me of lying about my race (why?) or think I'm from down South. As I've gotten older (I'm 59) and moved to a "white" city with my white wife I've kind of developed an a-racial attitude. It's something I don't feel like trying to explain anymore.

Dec. 16 2010 08:43 AM
Misha

I find it interesting that bi-racial or multi-racial is almost, by definition, African American and White. My kids are Black and Chinese and I find the hardest part of it is trying to figure out how to explain what it means to be Black (and I am the Black parent!) because we live in a culture in which (for better or worse) having brown skin does not necessarily equal a shared experience. Explaining Chinese culture is much more straight-forward because it is a culture that is less diffuse and more centered upon cultural practice, celebrations and common experience and understandings.

Dec. 15 2010 03:00 PM
sarah

Im a mut of white European put in short Irish. My husband 100% Bolivian. We "consider" my girls Hispanic. They look mixed, speak 2 languages, and IDK I was always jelous of people who had been able to hang on to a legit ethnicity, since mine had been diluted so much I claimed Ireland to aleast belong somewhere lol Good question.

Dec. 15 2010 02:20 PM
Siger from Cyberspace

How can there be a right answer to: how should a biracial person be identified and self-identify? It is like asking, if Bizet and Verdi were compatriots, would Verdi be French or Bizet Italian? There's no right answer. The entire conversation went around and around, shedding no light. Not news. Not very interesting, at least to me.

Dec. 15 2010 02:15 PM
Tiffany Rae from Voorhees

I am so happy to see people writing and discussing issues involving biracial individuals in today's America. As a life coach committed to building biracial relationships and mentoring multiracial families, mixed race children and biracial couples I think that it is important for the biracial and mono-racial communities to understand that a racial identity is NOT static. In fact, factors influence how we self-identify on a daily basis. Mixed-race individuals are both white and black, but not entirely white or black. We run the risk of being targeted by both whites and blacks and having our racial identity either challenged or confirmed. While I feel it is important to educate my biracial clients on the power that they have to choose to self-identify as they see fit, it is especially important for me as a life coach to find ways to engage the public, discuss new ideologies and challenge people to re-evaluate their level of racial awareness and understanding.
Similar topics are discussed on my website: www.tiffanyraecoaching.com.

Dec. 15 2010 01:18 PM
CeeMarie from Atlanta

Growing up I knew I looked different from the rest of my Black friends, but it wasn't until my mother was 30 years old did she find out her true identity, that her father was actually a German Jewish man, who had long passed away. My mom had been raised thinking she was just "light skinned" African American, even though her features and hair indicated that something else had to of been mixed in there. I as well inherited these features even though my father was also African American (somewhat lightskinned). Being teased, called White Girl, and constantly being asked "WHAT YOU MIXED WITH?" I sometimes lied- "...oh we are part Native American". I was always stared at being the Black Student Union President, or going to a Historically Black University, because the Blacks thought a Puerto Rican/ or a Mexican was the BSU President, lol. Finally as an adult I embrace my Jewish ancestry, and now identify myself as mixed race. The main reason why I do this is because when I tell people I am African American it always causes more problems having to explain my fair features, and get through the twisted looks people give, to say mixed race is just easier on the minds of the people who I interact with. I am also Muslim, and since deciding to wear a scarf I hear just about everything, most immigrant Muslims think I am one of them... without a scarf, Latinos think I am one of them... my daughter also inherits this "look" and I am curious on how she will identify herself in this new generation of mixed raced people!

Dec. 15 2010 08:51 AM
Falk from Germany

I may not know about struggles about racism in the U.S. as I am german, it must be pretty big and not dependimg on skincolour.
But isn't every white as well as black encouraging racism by only identifying over that? I mean why are we not talking about eyecolour? Even more mixes there!hooray (irony)

Dec. 15 2010 04:20 AM
Sam from NJ

The older I get, the more I want to describe my family as "mutts"

Dec. 14 2010 08:31 PM
Dylan from Upper East Side, New York City

it depends who I'm talking to, if i don't feeling like telling my life story. I tell people I'm black when they ask. if it's someone i know well i tell them i am mixed, half white british, black american.

Funny thing is when I try to tell Afro Americans I am black they don't believe it. They say what's your "nationality". Which has become the polite new way of asking race. In Brazil I just say pardo, South Africa I just say coloured. But this place is the most race obsessed.

Dec. 14 2010 07:16 PM
Elaine Schuster from Southfield, MI

I am bi-racial. My father is Anishinaabe, my mother was Caucasian. I identify as American Indian, Anishinaabe.

Dec. 14 2010 06:14 PM

I know this might sound more controversial, but I have no race or culture. I so mixed with different races I wouldn't begin to know where to start and as far as culture my family was stripped of that while some of them were slaves. So would black being the unknown best describe me. I guess?

Dec. 14 2010 05:03 PM
Esteban Castro via Facebook from Detroit, Mich.

I called myself a multi-race human (from the planet earth) on my Census form.

Dec. 14 2010 04:20 PM
Leah Johnson via Facebook from Brooklyn, NY

Biracial is one of the most inadequate terms in the history of "political correctness" as it attempts to tie a nice little bow on something that isn't so black and white (no pun intended). More often than not, using the term "biracial" is ...incorrect in practice.

Bi means two, and unless you are one of the magical people for whom no race-mixing has occurred anywhere in your lineage, you are already multi-ethnic, ESPECIALLY if you are a black American whose family has been here since slavery. I identify as black because it describes my skin, not my genetics. Black is the dominant trait and what people see when they look at me and my parents. Digging deeper, however, I also have white and native ancestry, so if I have child with man of *insert race here,* biracial would be a ridiculous way to describe them.

Dec. 14 2010 04:19 PM
Tiffany from NC

Interesting to see this phenomenon is far-reaching. The older I get the more reluctant I am to answer questions about my racial identity because it's not cut and dry. Both of my parents are mixed-race, so there's no simple answer for me. It's easiest just to say "black" although when filling out forms I tend to select "rather not answer."

Dec. 14 2010 04:12 PM
Alana, by text from Massachusetts

My religious and cultural background is Latino Catholic, however I was raised with a multicultural perspective and have since become a Humanist and an Atheist. This position did not fully form itself until my late 20's and I would probably have been considered Agnostic prior to then.

Dec. 14 2010 02:12 PM
By text from Ramsey, NJ

My mother is a white woman who grew up in Jersey ... my father is black and was raised in Barbados ... I refer to myself as biracial.

Dec. 14 2010 02:12 PM
Alana, by text from New York, NY

It depends on who I am talking to, and yes, the answer had changed over time.

Dec. 14 2010 02:12 PM
By text from New York, NY

I am in a mixed marriage. My wife is European and I am Japanese. And as much of my family is in Hawaii, my kids will be forever referred to as 'hapa haole' (half white)

Dec. 14 2010 02:11 PM
By text from Oklahoma

I just say I'm half Mexican.

Dec. 14 2010 02:11 PM

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