Virginia Judge Rules Health Care Law Unconstitutional

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Seniors attend a 'Medicare Monday' seminar at the Holly Creek retirement community on December 6, 2010 in Centennial, Colorado. 80 people came to learn how federal health care reform will affect them. Seniors attend a 'Medicare Monday' seminar (John Moore/Getty)

District courts across the country are passing judgement on the Obama administration's health care reform legislation. Yesterday Judge Henry E. Hudson ruled the "individual mandate," that requires everyone to purchase health insurance, was unconstitutional. He says the government overstretched its powers under the Constitution's "Commerce Clause," which allows Congress to regulate individual conduct that affects the economy. Judge Hudson's ruling opens up the debate further, but how will it play in higher courts? 

We speak with Sara Rosenbaum, Professor of Law at the School of Public Health at George Washington University.

Guests:

Sara Rosenbaum

Produced by:

Kateri A. Jochum

Comments [3]

Thank you for proving my point. After you learn to spell, do read the Constitution you claim to love so much. The founders intended it to be a radical progressive manifesto. It is a document of great strength and wisdom, which may well survive the current corporate right-wing onslaught.

Dec. 23 2010 11:53 PM
Walter Ring from Richmond, VA

Hey, Baruch DovBer from Brooklyn, NY-you talk so stoopid deah!!! The constitution has been so perverted by left-wing activist judges that it is about time one went our way, don't ya tink deah?

Dec. 14 2010 06:38 PM
Baruch DovBer from Brooklyn, NY

Right-wingers love to scream about "activist judges" "legislating from the bench" until some activist judge finds in their favor. (Hen it becomes "a great day for the constitution." Where I come from, that's called hypocrisy.

Dec. 14 2010 06:28 AM

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