Your Take: Talking to Kids About Santa Claus

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Most everybody knows about Santa Claus. Yesterday, we spoke to a 20-year veteran Saint Nick, and that got a conversation started: How do you approach the subject when there are questions about his real identity, or requests for presents that Santa can't deliver on? You had a lot of things to say on the topic. 

Christine from Pelham, NY, had this to say: 

 

I have three teenagers, now young adults.  When they were kids I had them give a list and told them if they didn't receive what they really wanted, even big things, I told them: "Santa chooses what he thinks you'll like best and that's it, and that's it! That's the magic of Christmas, you don't always get what you request for" 

I have three teenagers, now young adults.  When they were kids I had them give a list and told them if they didn't receive what they really wanted, even big things, I told them: "Santa chooses what he thinks you'll like best and that's it, and that's it! That's the magic of Christmas, you don't always get what you request for" 

Jason Chubb wrote this on Facebook

My son has asked for motorized vehicles many times now. We always tell him that Santa only buys pedal-powered vehicles because the motorized ones make kids fat and lazy.

 

Comments [2]

Samuel Landsman, Ph.D. from Syosset, NY

I'm sympathetic to many of the reasons parents are conflicted about disappointing their children when they ask for gifts from Santa Claus. But not the idea that they don't want to say no because they want their children to "dream big." To me, "dreaming big" should not be about what you can own, but about what you can do, what you can work for and achieve. I see no benefit in teaching children that they are entitled to whatever they want, simply because they want it, the bigger the better. Much of the blame for the wreck of our economy can be put to spending by adults who never learned to stop believing in Santa Clause.

Dec. 10 2010 06:23 PM
Peg from Upstate NY

How Santa taught my nephew to be an Atheist...

Once upon a time there was a little boy who had loving parents. Every year the little boy waited expectantly for Santa to come down the chimney and Deliver. And every time he lost a tooth, he waited expectantly for the Tooth Fairy to reach under his pillow and Deliver. And every year he waited for the Easter Bunny to Deliver the basket. And every Sunday he went to Church to learn about God.

When he was 10, he decided to hide on Christmas Eve and watch Santa Deliver. And to his dismay, he discovered that his parents were Delivering the presents from Santa. The next morning when the family met at the tree to open the presents, he thanked his Parents for the wonderful gifts. His dad said "Santa brought those presents." The boy looked down and shook his head, "No, you did."

His dad took him to the kitchen and the boy said, "Why did you lie to me?" The dad said because it's fun to "make believe" with little children. The boy said, "Is the Tooth Fairy real?" Again the father had to explain. "And what about the Easter Bunny?" Again the father had to explain... The boy pondered for a minute. Then he said, "If none of those were real, then explain to me why God is real." None of the Father's explanations made any more sense to the boy than the Tooth Fairy, so he continues to think that God is make believe to this day.

Dec. 07 2010 09:22 AM

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