Running an Election in a Time of Cholera : Slideshow

Friday, November 26, 2010

Clancy Nolan

Campaign posters for Haiti's 19 presidential candidates are plastered to nearly every building and wall in Port-au-Prince. A runoff will be held if no clear winner emerges in Sunday's election to replace outgoing President René Préval.

Clancy Nolan

Musician and presidential candidate Michel Martelly, best known as "Sweet Mickey," at a November 17 debate in Petionville, Haiti. Though not favored to win the election, Martelly's rallies draw large crowds of young supporters.

Clancy Nolan

Presidential candidate Mirlande Manigat waves to supporters after a debate. Longtime opposition leader and a former first lady, Manigat would become Haiti's first woman president if elected. Her husband, Leslie Manigat, served just four months as president in 1988 before being deposed in a military coup.

Clancy Nolan

Former Prime Minister and current presidential candidate Yvon Neptune greets supporters after the final round of debates in Petionville on Wednesday, November 17.

Clancy Nolan

Posters for Haiti presidential candidate Jude Celestin line the walls of a building in a trash-strewn area of Port-au-Prince. Celestin, a member of President René Préval's INITE (Unity) party, is one of the front-runners for the November 28 election.

Clancy Nolan

A man climbs through the rubble that was once the Notre Dame Cathedral of Port-au-Prince. More than 10 months after the earthquake, reconstruction is slow, with rubble choking the streets.

Clancy Nolan

UN troops drive past a group of homeless Haitians gathered to watch a screening of a presidential debate. The U.S. AID-sponsored group FilmAid International screened debates in several camps around Port-au-Prince.

Haitians watch a screening of the presidential debates in the Delmas 32 relief camp in Port-au-Prince. Despite heavy campaigning, thousands of Haitians lost their national identification cards during the earthquake and will be unable to vote. Some analysts estimate voter turnout will be as low as 40 percent.

Clancy Nolan

Dressed as the Haitian comedian Tonton Bicha, a performer lampoons the presidential candidates following a debate screening at a relief camp in Port-au-Prince.

Clancy Nolan

Ten months after the January 12 earthquake, roughly one million Haitians are still living in relief camps like this one, in the Delmas 32 area of Port-au-Prince.

Michael Mastroianni

Posters for Haiti's presidential candidates line the chain link fence surrounding the destroyed National Palace in Port-au-Prince.