Sarah Palin's Impact on the GOP, Present and Future

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Former vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin greats supporters during a rally for Republican John Raese's U.S. Senate campaign October 30, 2010 in Charleston, West Virginia. (Randy Snyder/Getty Images/Getty)

Love her or hate her, Sarah Palin is one of the most talked-about figures in politics today. With her new book, "America by Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag," coming out today, we wanted to hear from the people who love and support her in the Republican party.

We talk to Renee Amoore, deputy chair of the Pennsylvania Republican State Committee and founder and president of The Amoore Group, Inc. We also speak with Leslie Sanchez, former adviser to President George W. Bush, founder and CEO of Impacto Group, LLC, and a conservative political analyst, about how she sees Palin affecting the Republican Party and the country, and what she thinks about her future in politics.

Guests:

Renee Amoore and Leslie Sanchez

Comments [2]

one man's opinion from NJ, the 'tax me to death' state

I have always felt that if you were a Black American, then you would want to see a Black American for President.
And, if you were a woman, you would want to see a woman President.
Sarah would not have been my first pick but she might wind up becoming the first woman President and that is a good thing.
Like she can screw it up any worse then the last three?

Dec. 14 2010 03:51 PM

Palin is vacuous. If she is a example of what the GOP has to offer America 2012, this country is in bigger trouble then I thought.

Nov. 23 2010 08:28 AM

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