Samuel Kunz, Nazi Suspect, Dies at 89

Monday, November 22, 2010

Samuel Kunz was an 89-year-old about to stand trial for his alleged involvement in the death of more than 400,000 Jews in World War II. Kunz has died before he could face his charges, which included the accusation that he personally shot ten Jews dead at a prison camp in Poland during 1942-1943. Joining us for more on the story is Dr. Efraim Zuroff, director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center's Israel Office and author of "Operation Last Chance: One Man's Quest to Bring Nazi Criminals to Justice."

Guests:

Dr. Efraim Zuroff

Comments [3]

Truth from USA


Example of Correct Historical Fact.

"Kunz had admitted working at the Belzec extermination camp in German-occupied Poland in 1942-1943 and was charged in July with helping murder 430,000 Jews there. He remained free, however. "

Take notice misinformers...........

Nov. 23 2010 09:13 AM
Truth from USA


Please consider supporting Kosciuszko Foundation petition on German concentration/death camp.

The petition has been signed by many well-known Americans and Poles - log here to view more information: http://www.thekf.org:80/events/news/petition/

Nov. 23 2010 09:09 AM
Truth from USA

Your article misinforms your audience.

Poor with FALSE HISTORICAL FACTS

The author is not an Expert of this topic and deals in FICTION.


"The German camps in occupied Poland during World War II were built by Nazi Germany during its Occupation of Poland (1939–1945). A system of camps of various kinds was established across the entire country.
German occupied Poland was a prison-like territory and it contained more than 430 camp complexes before the mass extermination began of Jews of Polish and other nationalities. Some of the major ones, such as Stutthof and Auschwitz, consisted of dozens subsidiary camps.
The racist policies against Slavs and other ethnic groups and various "undesirables" filled the labor and concentration camps from the first days of the occupation, and continued throughout the war."

Nov. 23 2010 09:05 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.