Puzzle Creator Releases Clue to Final Part of 'Kryptos'

Cryptography sculpture at CIA headquarters has defied complete decoding for 20 years

Monday, November 22, 2010

Jim Sanborn has spent nearly 20 years watching his cryptography sculpture, "Kryptos," sit only partially-solved in the C.I.A.'s headquarters in Langley, Virginia. Sanborn recently released a clue for people attempting to decipher the enigmatic and beautiful piece of sculpture (spoiler alert): one of the words in the unsolved 97-letter section is ... "BERLIN."

Joining us to discuss the puzzle, its significance, and her years of observation on the code's followers is Elonka Dunin, a game developer and co-founder of the Kryptos Discussion Group, for people attempting to solve the cipher.

Guests:

Elonka Dunin

Produced by:

David J Fazekas

Comments [5]

Jose Galdfre manero from Barcelona SPAIN europe

hELLO

+ iF Letters 64-69 "NYPVTT" = "BERLIN" then K4 can be:

".....PEOPLE TO CREATE A SAFER FREER WORLD AND SURELY THERE IS NO BETTER PLACE THAN BERLIN THE MEETING PLACE OF EAST AND WEST."

— By Ronald Reagan, address at the Brandenburg Gate, June 12, 1987.

Because if K4 is a real text (like K3), then i should find key phrases/quotes related to Berlin (place). I look for the most important and beautiful texts (Kennedy & Reagan speeches)

And here I found this fragment:
http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/ronaldreaganbrandenburggate.htm

This is a very nice solution but I have not a mathematical explanation.

Bye from Spain.

Jan. 27 2014 04:34 PM
Paul Sagi from Kuala Lumpur

One other thing of significance is that Jim Sanborn chose to release the clue on November 22, the 47th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination. I bore that in mind when solving the puzzle. The 22nd of November and Berlin have Kennedy in common. It was then a matter of finding what is common to Kennedy and Berlin and is comprised of 97 characters. Of course it has to be the famous quote from the speech Kennedy gave in Berlin.

Nov. 23 2010 02:25 AM
Paul Sagi from Kuala Lumpur

Sorry for any confusion. I put below my final corrected conjecture:

Given the clue of Berlin and the character count, I presume the section decodes to (minus the outermost quotation marks and spaces)

"And, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words “Ich bin ein Berliner.” John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Berlin 1963"

(I've not yet tried to decode it to see if I'm correct)

Paul Sagi
Kuala Lumpur

**********************************************************************************************************
Fertilize a Mind - Plant an Idea

The geeks shall inherit the earth.

There are 1Ø types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

There's no place like ::1 and 127.Ø.Ø.1
**********************************************************************************************************

Nov. 22 2010 11:53 PM
Paul Sagi from Kuala Lumpur

Instead of a comma after Berlin I think instead there should be a period after Berliner.

Nov. 22 2010 11:47 PM
Paul Sagi from Kuala Lumpur

Given the clues of Berlin and the character count, I presume the section decodes to (minus the outermost quotation marks and spaces)

"And, therefore, as a free man, I take pride in the words “Ich bin ein Berliner” John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Berlin 1963"

(I've not yet tried to decode it to see if I'm correct)

Paul Sagi

**********************************************************************************************************
Fertilize a Mind - Plant an Idea

The geeks shall inherit the earth.

There are 1Ø types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don't.

There's no place like ::1 and 127.Ø.Ø.1
**********************************************************************************************************

Nov. 22 2010 10:58 PM

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