How Environmentally Friendly is the Hajj?

Protecting the planet is an essential tenet of Islam. So why is the Hajj so environmentally harmful?

Monday, November 15, 2010

Islam is in many ways an essentially green religion, with foremost ethical principles stressing the importance of protecting the Earth and living in harmony with nature. But the Hajj, which officially began yesterday, has in recent years been attracting negative attention for its environmentally unfriendly effects. What does it mean when one of Islam's holiest events leads to environmental damage?

Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, author of Green Deen: What Islam Teaches About Protecting the Planet, joins us to discuss this connundrum, and explain recent efforts to make the Hajj more green. We also hear from the BBC's Shaimaa Khalil, who is at the Hajj in Saudi Arabia..

Guests:

Ibrahim Abdul-Matin and Shaimaa Khalil

Comments [2]

Joanie from Queens, NY

Anna is an idiot. The author was saying all religions have large "green" elements and as a Muslim, he's happy to share those in Islam - since no one ever thinks about faith and environmentalism as a pair. UNLIKE other religions, Islam isn't given any credit for its positive aspects. UNLIKE other religions, the negative actions of Muslims are blown out of proportion - pun intended. Read a book Anna - get your head out of your ars.

Nov. 16 2010 03:29 PM
anna from new york

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Islam is a religion of peace and love, a "green" religion, etc.
This guy, who claims that UNLIKE other religions, Islam is sooooooo green and he knows it, because he read all Quran and saw so many "green" passages, is a perfect moron.
Dear, beloved moron. Why don't you familiarize yourself with such concepts, as selective or ideological reading. I am also sure that you mastered Hebrew and other languages, such as Aramaic and Greek and read not only the Hebrew Bible, but also the Talmud and are uniquely qualified to declare what is or isn't "green."
Those "humanists" who preach the power of human intellect should revise their dogmas.

Nov. 15 2010 07:53 AM

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