Delayed Dreams and Low Pay for the Malemployed

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

We all know the words unemployment and underemployment, but are you familiar with the term "malemployment?" Chances are, even if you don’t know the word, you know some who’s suffering through it. Malemployment, unlike underemployment, isn’t about workers having too little work. It’s about college degree holders working jobs that don’t require college degrees. 

This happens to be the case for a huge percentage of the population in their twenties right now, including twenty-five year-old Mark Jack. Mark has a college degree in literature, but is employed as a barista and bartender in Brooklyn, New York. The Takeaway’s work and personal finance contributor Beth Kobliner is here to explain more about malemployment…how to cope with it, and whether it has to spell the end of professional dreams for those who are grappling with it.

Guests:

Mark Jack

Produced by:

Kristen Meinzer

Contributors:

Beth Kobliner

Comments [1]

Peg

America does not have enough JOBS for everyone. America does not make anything (except military hardware) anymore. America has too many "virtual' desk jobs (soon they will be gone).

Why haven't the tax breaks for the rich which have been in effect for 8 years and were supposed to "trickle down" on us - created jobs here in America? It's because the USA is an overpriced poor investment compared to the rest of the world. When the wealthy decide to unleash their huge reservoirs of cash - it will not be "trickling down" in America.

America will not have jobs for everyone until we switch to an environmentally sustainable economy. There's actually a lot of WORK that needs to be done here - but as of yet, we haven't figured out how to make that type of WORK pay. How about starting by taxing the wealthy?

Nov. 09 2010 07:05 AM

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