Veteran Alaska and Delaware journalists analyze the Palin-Biden VP debate

Friday, October 03, 2008

Two journalists with experience covering Governor Sarah Palin, R-Alaska, and Senator Joe Biden, D-Del., give a post-game analysis of last night's sole vice-presidential debate.
Guests: Rita Farrell, a former Reuters correspondent, has covered Biden since he first came to the Senate in 1972, and Larry Persily, a longtime Alaska journalist and a former employee in Sarah Palin’s Washington office. Persily was a questioner at her 2006 gubernatorial debate.

Comments [1]

Renee

Yes, Palin did better than expected. But, why are the standards set low for the second top position in our country? If I was interviewing for a job, I am expected to do well or better than the other candidates. There seems to be a double standard when it comes to Palin. The indisputable fact is that she did not answer all questions that were asked of her. She appeared to veer off in her own direction. Her style was evasive, elusive and her speech pattern was circular. She was lucky that the questions asked did not require examples or detail information as seen on Katie Couric and Charles Gibson’s interviews. Even though, Biden is competing for the same position, he was clearly holding back from being combative. He should have been able to say a lot more about her position and answers. Biden’s responses were to the point and he was more focused.

In addition, Palin was trying to sound like she is just one of us. One of us is not qualified to be a President or Vice President of this great nation. We all would want someone who knows what they are doing. Being likable and sweet does not qualify anyone for the toughest job in this country.

Palin tried to make Joe Biden as some one who has been in Washington too long.
“I do respect your years in the Senate, but I think Americans are craving something new and different.” Did she forget that McCain has been in the Senate for 26 years?

Oct. 03 2008 10:22 AM

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