WNYC's NAACP-100 coverage

 

WNYC has gone to the archives and pulled out some remarkable sound and pictures from the NAACP's 100-year history, including:

  • Marian Anderson singing at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939
  • Audio from NAACP leaders in the 30's and 40's.
  • President Harry Truman addressing the NAACP in 1947
  • A slideshow of historic pictures

Recently in 100 Years of the NAACP

[Web Special] NAACP Centennial: What the World Looked Like in 1909

Monday, July 13, 2009

"Whites and Blacks Confer as Equals"—that was a headline on page 2 of The New York Times on June 1, 1909, about "a conference to consider the uplifting of the negro."

It wasn't even called the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People yet; the first appearance of the phrase in the Times didn't come until the following year, in a one-paragraph article noting that "Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, the well-known negro man of letters," had been appointed the new organization's director of research and publicity. (With almost certainly unintended irony, the paragraph was tacked on at the end of a three-column review of a book in praise of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.) The idea for the conference had been hatched that January in New York, at a private meeting in which a dwindling remnant of upper-caste abolitionists joined forces with progressive journalists and social workers. The announcement of the conference went out on February 12 over the name of William English Walling, a Kentucky-born journalist and social activist. It was the hundredth anniversary of the birth of another son of Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln. ... (continue reading)

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Marking the NAACPs Centennial Convention

Monday, July 13, 2009

The NAACP has gathered in New York for a six-day convention celebrating its 100-year anniversary. It’s an enormous affair with giants such as Cornel West, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and President Obama paying tribute to the accomplishments of the civil rights organization. The civil rights group was formed by a multi-racial coalition in 1909, sparked in 1908 by a deadly race riot in Springfield Illinois. Nearly a century later, Barack Obama launched his presidential campaign not far from where the riot took place. Looking at the challenges ahead and its past accomplishments we are joined by Melissa Harris-Lacewell. She is an Associate Professor of Politics and African American Studies at Princeton University.

Read about what was life was like for black Americans in 1909.

"Every civil rights organization ultimately wants to die. Because the goal is to have full equality. And if you have full equality then your institutional purpose is no longer important."
—Melissa Harris Lacewell on the anniversary of the NAACP

The Takeaway will be covering the convention all week long. Tomorrow we continue the conversation with the artists' take on the NAACP’s legacy. We’ll be joined by musical sensation DJ Spooky and poet Elizabeth Alexander.

 

 

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DJ Spooky: Civil Rights Unbound

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Throughout the last century, the struggle of the civil rights movement has been documented in photos, speeches, poems and paintings. Paul Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, mixed clips from the long history of the civil rights movement and created a digital media collage that was commissioned specifically for the NAACP’s centennial. It's called, "Winds of Change: A Composition and Homage to the NAACP on 100 Years of Change." The Takeaway talks to DJ Spooky about his work.

 

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The Obama Administration and the Legacy of the NAACP

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

This week the NAACP is convening for its centennial celebration in New York City and The Takeaway is talking to leaders from around the country about the future of this 100-year old institution. Van Jones, Special Advisor to the White House Council on Environmental Quality and author of The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems joins the show to discuss the legacy of the NAACP.

Read about what was life was like for black Americans in 1909.

Click through for a transcript of our conversation with Van Jones

 

 

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Benjamin Jealous and the Next Generation at the NAACP

Wednesday, July 15, 2009

This week the NAACP kicked off a six-day convention celebrating its 100 year anniversary. Even with Barack Obama as our first African American president, the NAACP sees its work as far from finished. Last year, Benjamin Jealous, then 35, became the organization’s youngest president, with a plan to bring the NAACP into the 21st century. Mr. Jealous joins The Takeaway's John Hockenberry and guest-host Farai Chideya to discuss his vision for the NAACP and how he’s taking on the challenges of race relations and equality.

Click through for a transcript of our discussion with Benjamin Jealous.

 

 

"We’re focused not just on full employment, if you will, but also on job quality. Let’s not forget that slavery was a full employment economy."
—NAACP President Ben Jealous on unemployment numbers in the African-American community

Here's Benjamin Jealous' address at the NAACP's Centennial Celebration:

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The NAACP's Legal Legacy

Thursday, July 16, 2009

Today the NAACP wraps up its convention celebrating its 100-year anniversary. For a look at what the group's future fights for civil rights should be and how their past accomplishments shaped the nation, we are joined by Lani Gunier. Lani Guinier is the Bennett Boskey Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. She is also the first and only tenured black female professor at Harvard Law School.

We’ve been covering the NAACP’s centennial convention all week. Tomorrow we wrap up the conversation with linguist John McWhorter. We’ll look at his vision for keeping the NAACP relevant in the 21st Century.

Click through for a transcript of our conversation with Lani Guinier

Read about what was life was like for black Americans in 1909.

 

 

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President Obama Addresses the NAACP

Friday, July 17, 2009

Last night the first African-American President of the United States, Barack Obama, addressed the NAACP convention. His speech was a poignant capstone for the organization's hundred-year history. Farai Chideya, guest host of The Takeaway, hosted a special broadcast from the anniversary. She was joined by Patrik Henry Bass, Takeaway contributor and editor at Essence magazine, Melissa Harris-Lacewell, an associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University, and Michael Meyers the president and executive director of the New York Civil Rights Coalition.

(Click through for the full advance transcript of President Obama's speech

 

 

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The Legacy: Reactions to Obama's NAACP Speech

Friday, July 17, 2009

As the NAACP wrapped up the celebration of its 100-year history, President Barack Obama stopped by to address the crowd. Joining us with their reactions to the president's speech and the legacy of the NAACP are Geraldine Sam, the first African-American female mayor of LaMarque, Texas, Reihan Salam, a fellow at the New American Foundation, and Farai Chideya, friend of The Takeaway.

 

"This is exactly what he's going to be remembered for in 20 or 30 years: His ability to communicate with his community in a very frank and open and tough-minded way."
—Reihan Salam on Barack Obama's speech to the NAACP

If you missed President Obama's speech, you can watch it in its entirety below.

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Rebooting the NAACP for the 21st Century

Friday, July 17, 2009

Yesterday the NAACP wrapped up its Centennial Convention. The Takeaway has been covering the convention all week, from DJ Spooky’s artistic take on the African-America experience to President Obama’s address last night. Today, as part of the “after the party” conversation, we are joined by John McWhorter to look at the relevance of the 100-year old institution and the challenges it faces in taking on 21st century discrimination. John McWhorter is a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and Adjunct Professor at Columbia, his latest book is Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English.

 

"The funding that Barack Obama is giving to community colleges, that is race-targeted legislation in its way. And I think that's wonderful. And I think we lose sight of that if, say, the NAACP continues to focus on discrimination as the main meal."
—John McWhorter on President Obama's address to the NAACP

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[Web Special] NAACP Women Made History in Tennessee

Friday, July 17, 2009

To commemorate the NAACP's Centennial, we take you to Franklin County, a rural area of 40,000 people in the southern part of Middle Tennessee. In 1958, two black women — Mrs. Johnnie Fowler, and Mickey Marlow — and one white man — Scott Bates — formed the area's first branch of the NAACP, the "Franklin County Branch." It's one of the few branches nationwide where female activists, and not men, led the town's desegregation efforts. One woman is still alive to tell the story of their struggle: Ms. Sarah Staten.

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