Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

Battle of the Behemoths: Google vs. Microsoft

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Google has announced it is planning to launch an operating system for personal computers. This move is seen as a direct challenge to Microsoft's dominance in the PC operating system market. Google's move worries privacy groups—and also competitors—who argue that the online search company could leverage its data stores to quickly grow market share. For more, The Takeaway is joined by Sam Grobart, personal technology editor for The New York Times.

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Reincarnating Dinner: The Art and Etiquette of Leftovers

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

You're staring into the refrigerator, wondering what to serve for dinner, and you see it: leftover meatloaf. Can you proudly offer your guests meatloaf sandwiches? Or do you need to keep your leftovers to yourself, like a dark secret? To discuss the etiquette of leftovers, we are joined by Henry Alford, who has an article in today’s New York Times on the kooky behavior leftovers inspire. And Melissa Clark, our friend and food writer for The New York Times, is here to provide some practical options for reincarnating dinner.

For more, read Henry Alford's article, The Question of Leftovers, Ever Fresh, in The New York Times.

Recipes

Leftover rice or risotto? Try Arancini di Riso

Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
2 large eggs, beaten to blend
2 cups leftover cooked rice or risotto
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
1 1/2 cups dried Italian-style bread crumbs
2 ounces mozzarella, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
Salt
Pepper

• Pour enough oil in a heavy large saucepan to reach the depth of 3 inches. Heat the oil over medium heat to 350 degrees F.

• Stir the eggs, risotto or rice, Parmesan, salt and pepper to taste, and 1/2 cup of the bread crumbs in a large bowl to combine.

• Place the remaining breadcrumbs into a medium bowl.

• Using about 2 tablespoons of the rice mixture for each ball, form 2-inch-diameter balls.

• Insert 1 cube of mozzarella into the center of each ball. Roll the balls in the bread crumbs to coat.

• Working in batches, add the rice balls to the hot oil and cook until brown and heated through, turning them as necessary, approximately 4 minutes.

• Using a slotted spoon, transfer the rice balls to paper towels to drain. Season with salt. Let rest 2 minutes. Serve hot.

If you have leftover salmon try Red Flannel Salmon Hash

8 ounces leftover salmon

1 medium-size red beet, roasted or boiled until tender, peeled, and cut into 1/2-inch dice

1 1/2 cups boiled potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1 small onion finely chopped

1 clove garlic, finely chopped

2 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon olive oil

Salt

Pepper

Heat butter in a heavy pan (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. When melted add olive oil, then onions. Cook onions until soft, about 8 minutes. Add potatoes, garlic, and beet and big pinch of salt and pepper. Break up the salmon into large chunks and add to pan. Stir well and press the mixture firmly into the bottom of the pan. Allow to cook until a nice brown crust develops on the bottom. Stir well, press down firmly into the pan and allow mixture to form a crust again. Season with salt and pepper. Top with poached eggs for an easy supper.

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More Unemployment, More Murders and Suicides

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

A new study reveals a surprising cost of rising unemployment: during a recession, murder and suicide rates increase. The solution? Support groups. Here to tell us more is study co-author David Stuckler, a sociologist fellow at Oxford University. Stuckler is joined by American Chet Kaminski, currently an accountant who this past spring was compelled to join a social unemployment network after eight months without a job.

You can read the study about the public health affects of job loss by checking out the journal article in this week's issue of the medical journal, The Lancet.

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Cyberattacks on U.S. and South Korean Computers

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Over the holiday weekend, a concerted cyber attack disrupted computers at several U.S. government agencies, including the websites of the Treasury, the Secret Service, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Department of Transportation. Officials say it was a sophisticated hack that required more expertise than your average cyber assailant. Meanwhile, South Korea's computers were also hacked with a "denial of service" virus. The crimes were remarkably similar, raising speculation about the source of the crime. For more of the story, The Takeaway talks to Siobhan Gorman, the Wall Street Journal's intelligence correspondent

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Climate Tops the Agenda at G8 Summit

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

At this week's G-8 world summit, climate change is an unexpected guest at a meeting usually filled with talks of nuclear disarmament, the world's poor, and trade networks. The meeting takes place in L'Aquila, Italy, the site of the recent earthquake. With the start of the summit comes President Obama's debut into the world of climate negotiations. Can we expect any agreement to come out of this round of talks — all of which are setting the stage for a post-Kyoto climate treaty in Copenhagen in December? Here with his take is Jason Burnett, former energy and climate official with the EPA, now founder of Burnett EcoEnergy, a company that funds clean energy projects.

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The Lucky Few: Fans Who Attended Jackson's Memorial

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Of Michael Jackson's millions of fans worldwide, only a few thousand were lucky enough to attend the memorial service in the Staples Center in Los Angeles. The Takeaway talks to Melvin Price, an electrician in North Hampton, England, who flew to Los Angeles and was rewarded with the miraculous appearance of two tickets to the service, and with Karen Thompson, a cosmetologist from Compton, California, who was also at the memorial service.

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Hospitals Pledge to Help Uninsured

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Hospitals are the latest front of President Obama's drive to reform health care. Vice President Joe Biden is expected to announce today that hospitals have agreed to spend $150 billion dollars over the next ten years to care for some of the uninsured. What does that mean for hospitals—and patients? The Takeaway talks to Dr. Herbert Pardes, President and CEO of New York Presbyterian Hospital and to New York Times reporter David Herszenhorn.

For more, read David Herszenhorn's and Sheryl Gay Stolberg's article, Health Deals Could Harbor Hidden Costs, in The New York Times.

"Patients who don't have a doctor, don't have a nurse practitioner, someone who takes care of them, are often coming to the emergency room too late, more sick, with more required costs. The emergency rooms around the country are just choked."
— Dr. Herbert Pardes on healthcare for the uninsured

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A New Way to Make a Baby? Creating Sperm in the Lab

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Scientists in the U.K. claim that for the first time they've created human sperm from embryonic stem cells. While the advance is a huge scientific leap that could allow infertile men to have children, it also raises ethical concerns. For more on this new step in reproductive biology, The Takeaway turns to Clive Cookson, Science Editor for the Financial Times.

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Farewell Michael

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

Across the nation yesterday fans stopped mid-workday to bid farewell to Michael Jackson. In a funeral fit for a King of Pop, the Jackson family was joined by celebrities, lifelong friends, and orators, with Jackson's golden coffin on the stage at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Thousands of fans were there; millions more watched on television and the internet. Joining us to talk about it is Alessandra Stanley, a New York Times television critic.

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Unrest in China Disrupts a Summit in Italy

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

As Han and Uighur Chinese battle each other in a flare up of ancient ethnic tensions, the flashpoint city of Urumqi in China's Xinjiang province has been filled with Chinese soldiers trying to quell the violence. The unrest, which may be the worst since the Cultural Revolution, prompted Chinese President Hu Jintao to leave the G8 meeting in Italy to attend to the situation. For the latest, The Takeaway is joined by Ted Plafker, a correspondent in the Beijing Bureau of The Economist who is in Urumqi, China, and Yuwen Wu, the editor of the BBC's Mandarin service.

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Obama to Medvedev: We're in the Same Boat, Comrade

Wednesday, July 08, 2009

During his recent visit to Russia, President Obama made a point of repeating that the U.S. and Russia have many common interests. Do the U.S. and Russia have the same goals on the global level? Or are the former Cold War rivals still ideologically at odds? To help answer those questions, The Takeaway turns to Strobe Talbott, President of the Brookings Institution and former Deputy Secretary of State in the Clinton administration. He is also the author of The Great Experiment: The Story of Ancient Empires, Modern States, and the Quest for a Global Nation.

"There is this deep, deep resentment, festering resentment about the United States. The Russians have a real case of the 'Rodney Dangerfield Syndrome' – they just feel they don't get enough respect, and they're going to stomp their feet and get more. That's their tactic."
—Strobe Talbott, president of the Brookings Institution on U.S. relations with Russia

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Live from L.A., for the Michael Jackson Memorial Service

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Josh Rogosin, an independent public radio producer, has been staked out at the Staples Center in Los Angeles since way before the dawn. He's been talking to fans and mourners who have begun to fill the streets of downtown Los Angeles in preparation for Michael Jackson's memorial service. The Takeaway joins Josh on the street along with fans from across the nation; we also talk to Aaron Flournoy, a waiter at Bennigan's in Jackson's hometown of Gary, Indiana.

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Michael Jackson's Complex Legacy

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

As fans across the world await the memorial service for Michael Jackson, The Takeaway takes a moment to discuss his legacy as a legend, a performer and as an African American man from Gary, Indiana. We are joined by Steven Gray, reporter for Time Magazine, who wrote Michael Jackson and the Black Experience for Time.

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The Future of Advertising

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

As much as the world of journalism is having to react and evolve quickly due to the proliferation of blogs and social networking sites like Twitter taking over much of the fast-paced reporting, so too does the world of advertising. In the face of technological advances like TiVo, which allow viewers to fast forward over their very bread-and-butter, ad agencies and the companies they represent are having to get very creative to capture consumers' attention. To discuss the brave new world of 30-second spot- free advertising, we turn to advertising consultant and former chairman of ad agency BBH, Cindy Gallop.

Click through for transcript

Here's how one company is handling the change in advertising:

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In the Eyes of the Pope, Profit as Sin

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Tomorrow President Obama heads to Italy for the opening of the G8 summit. He will meet with Pope Benedict, who has just issued a new encyclical calling for a new financial world order. In the paper, called "Charity in Truth," the Pope draws on traditional Catholic teaching in rebuking the profit-at-all-costs mentality of the global economy. Greed is a mortal sin, after all. For more, The Takeaway talks to David Willey, Rome correspondent for our partners the BBC.

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Mortality and Morality: The Remains of Michael Jackson

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

Michael Jackson will be buried this morning at the Forest Lawn cemetery in Los Angeles. The cemetery is a famous resting spot, but Jackson apparently wanted to be buried at his beloved Neverland Ranch. Joining The Takeaway to discuss whether we should defer to the dead when it comes to disposing of their mortal remains is Randy Cohen, The Ethicist for The New York Times Magazine and author of the Moral of the Story Blog.

For more, read Randy Cohen's blog entry, Michael Jackson’s Body, in The New York Times.

"The physical presence of the dead is very, very meaningful for the living simply to grasp the idea that death has occurred."
— New York Times Magazine columnist Randy Cohen

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Energy Use: Keeping Down with Your Neighbors

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

It's widely believed that if you knew how much energy you used every day, you'd be more motivated to cut back. But what if you also knew how much your neighbors used? Would you be even more careful not to hog resources? The city of Sacramento is experimenting with an energy awareness system in the hopes that it will push residents to conserve energy. It's a start-up project by a company called Positive Energy. The Takeaway is joined by the mind behind that company, and a professor of social psychology at Arizona State University, Robert Cialdini.

"When we send them the information that says 'You're doing better than your neighbors,' we put a smiley face emoticon next to the information."
— Robert Cialdini of Arizona State University on encouraging energy conservation

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The Changing Relationship with Russia

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

During their meeting in Moscow, Presidents Obama and Medvedev hammered out a deal to limit nuclear arsenals. Non-proliferation is the key to Obama's desire to limit arms, but when talking nukes with Russia, is it just the same old song-and-dance between the former Cold War enemies? Can the United States' relationship with Russia change? The Takeaway turns to the BBC's Defense and Security Correspondent Rob Watson and Mark Kramer, Director of the Cold War Studies Project at Harvard University and a senior fellow at Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies for their analysis.

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Sarah Palin's Supporters Speak Out

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

For the most of the punditocracy, Sarah Palin’s resignation as Governor of Alaska last Friday remains a mystery. But for those on Team Sarah, her move was the right one. Joining us to discuss why Sarah Palin's move makes sense is blogger Jimmie Bise, founder of Sundries Shack, and Marjorie Dannenfelser, President of the Susan B. Anthony List and co-founder of its project Team Sarah.

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Ethnic Tension in Northwest China Erupts into Riots

Tuesday, July 07, 2009

In the northwest corner of China, rival protesters took to the streets again on Tuesday, defying the Chinese government's efforts to lock down the province after clashes between Muslim Uighurs and Han Chinese left over 150 people dead and more than a 1,000 injured. The authorities imposed curfews, cut off cellphone and Internet services and sent armed police officers into neighborhoods in the Xinjiang province. For more we turn to Shirong Chen, China Editor for the BBC.

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