Dr. Susan P. Fisher-Hoch

epidemiologist University of Texas, School of Public Health

It's hard to begin describing the life of Dr. Fisher-Hoch. Suffice it to say, she's an expert on infectious diseases. She's studied rabies in Bangkok, Lassa Fever in Sierra Leone, and cholera in Pakistan. She's worked for the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, and is co-author of, "Level 4: Virus Hunters for the CDC," a biographic book about her adventures traveling around the world to study disease outbreaks.

Dr. Susan P. Fisher-Hoch appears in the following:

I Am The Virus

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Ever since this whole "swine flu" thing erupted it's been nothing but talk about humans, humans, humans. But what's it been like to be a virus these last few weeks? Today, we shrink down to take a look at life from the point of view of one of the world's smallest biological toxins. How, really, do viruses get out of one organism and travel to another? (Warning: It's pretty gross.) What perils face a virus that ventures outside the human body? Our microscopic tour guide is The Takeaway's favorite virus hunter, Dr. Susan P. Fisher-Hoch, an epidemiologist at the University of Texas School of Public Health and co-author of Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC.

If you want to see the view of the body a virus sees, all you have to do is watch Fantastic Voyage, a 1966 classic in which "four men and a beautiful lady" were shrunk down and sent into the bloodstream on a submarine (it was not yellow):

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Update on swine flu death in Texas

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The spokeswoman for Houston's Department of Health and Human Services, Kathy Barton, told the Houston Chronicle a few details about the child who succumbed to the flu, marking the first death in the United States from the H1N1 virus. It was revealed that the child was from Mexico, had become ill in Brownsville, Texas, and was transported to Houston for treatment. The child died Monday in an unidentified Houston hospital. There have been no reported Houston-area cases of the disease, so far. It's the first death outside of Mexico, where the outbreak first began. And out of the 65 confirmed cases of swine flu in the U.S., most of them are mild. The CDC still has to release more details, but for we go to Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch. She's a former CDC staffer, an epidemiologist at University of Texas School of Public Health, and co-author of the book, Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC.

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Swine flu claims a life in the U.S.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The Center for Disease Control has just confirmed the first swine flu-related death in the United States. Despite the CDC's warning that deaths would occur in the United States, the news is still shocking. For how, or if, this death changes the discussion, we turn to Dr. Susan P. Fisher-Hoch, a former CDC staffer, now an epidemiologist at the University of Texas School of Public Health and co-author of the book, Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC.

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Virus hunters chase down the swine flu

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

The world has found a new strain of flu, so now what? Enter the virus hunters. This pack of epidemiologists, virologists, and infectious disease experts (sounds like a fun party) are fast on the bug's tail, looking for answers that may help us control its spread. What are they trying to figure out? How long will it take to rustle up some answers? And when you're an epidemiologist chasing down a flu virus, what do you do in your lab all day? The Takeaway is joined by Dr. Susan P. Fisher-Hoch, an epidemiologist at the University of Texas School of Public Health and co-author of the book, Level 4: Virus Hunters of the CDC. ,br/>
"It's a very bad idea just to go to the doctor's with a mild fever because that's the place to get infected because everybody will go there with their infected kids and their infected older people."
—Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch on the spread of swine flu

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