Sitara Nieves

Senior Producer

Sitara Nieves appears in the following:

A Ramadan Roadtrip Around The US

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Two men are spending Ramadan in 30 different mosques in 30 different states for all 30 days of the month of fasting. They're traveling 13,000 miles, from Alaska to New York City, and are speaking with us today from South Carolina, where they're a little more than halfway through their trip. What they've found is that generations of American Muslims have lived in small pockets of the U.S. since the 1800s.

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Random House to Publish Seven Rare Dr. Seuss Stories

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Dr. Seuss fans, rejoice. This fall, seven rare Seuss stories, which were previously printed in Redbook, will be published in book form. The stories — which he wrote between 1950 and 1951 — have fantastically Seussian titles: "The Bippolo Seed," "Zinniga-Zanniga," "Tadd and Todd," and "Gustav the Goldfish." The compilation is called "The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories by Dr. Seuss," and Random House is publishing it in late September.

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Eric Schmitt on 'The Untold Story of America's Secret Campaign Against al-Qaeda'

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

In their new book, "Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America's Secret Campaign Against al-Qaeda," New York Times reporters Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker provide an inside look at what goes on behind the scenes of U.S. counter-intelligence, and how national security efforts against terrorism have evolved in the almost ten years since 9/11.

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Talking With New Poet Laureate Philip Levine, Part Two

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Last week, the Library of Congress named Philip Levine as the next poet laureate, succeeding W.S. Merwin. Previous writers who were awarded that title include Robert Frost, Billy Collins, and Maxine Kumin. Levine was once an auto plant worker in Detroit, and that city became the basis for many of his poems. We spoke with Levine yesterday, about his reputation as a working class poet.

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In Tripoli, Power Outages and Skyrocketing Prices Fray Nerves

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

As rebel forces press on towards the Libyan capitol of Tripoli, the BBC's Matthew Price has gone inside the beseiged city to report on conditions for the people living there. So far, he's reported there are frequent power outages, skyrocketing food prices, nighttime bombing attacks, and fuel shortages. One resident said people are selling their gold and cars and using the proceeds to buy generators.

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Big Ideas to Fix the Economy: Raise Inflation

Monday, August 15, 2011

We've been asking our listeners for ideas on how to fix the economy. Congress has raised the debt ceiling and established a "super committee" to find ways to reduce America's debt. It's clear that the country needs a concrete plan to fix the economy. One suggestion that some of our listeners have is to increase inflation.

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How To Stop Gang Violence: Lessons From Chicago for the UK

Friday, August 12, 2011

How should the United Kingdom combat the violence that's raged across the country all week? British Prime Minister David Cameron says the country needs to learn a few lessons from America on how to fight gangs, along with possibly revoking social media and Blackberry service from rioters. What can the U.S. offer as advice for the U.K. on handling gang violence?

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From the Royal Wedding to Riots, A Swift Downturn for the UK

Friday, August 12, 2011

In April, the climate in the United Kingdom was jubilant, as Prince William and Kate Middleton wed at Westminster Abbey. Afterward, one million people lined the route from Westminster to Buckingham Palace, and citizens threw parties and rejoiced in the streets. Four months later, the atmosphere across the pond is the complete opposite of celebratory, as riots and civil unrest spread and violence continues.

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Capturing the Disgruntled Independent Vote

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Independent voters were a key part of the coalition that elected Barack Obama in 2008. But President Obama has lost the support of many of those independents, throughout his term. As potential candidates begin to prepare for the 2012 presidential election, the hunt is on to try to capture the independent vote.

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A Contest to Create Jobs

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Joblessness is an ongoing problem in the U.S. and in countries abroad. But fifteen semi-finalists are currently competing in a contest that's hopes to put some of those people back to work. The contest is called Powering Economic Opportunity: Create a World That Works, and it's being produced by the eBay Foundation and Ashoka Changemakers. The contest's winners will get $50,000 to build their ideas. Voting is open to the general public via the contest's website, and ends today at 5 p.m. EST.

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In This Market, All that Glitters is Gold

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Gold appears to be wearing a kryptonite vest as everything around it crumbles. In the face of stocks free-falling globally, the economy continuing to struggle, and jobs still hard to come by for millions of Americans, gold is surging. Gold rose to over $1,700 an ounce yesterday, and many believe we could see it top $2,000. We look at the history of gold starting when it was a mere $35 an ounce back in 1970.

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Peter Parker Replaced By Miles Morales: The New Spider-Man

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

The latest issue of the long-running Spider-Man comic book series comes out today, and there's a brand-new protagonist. Miles Morales, a half-Latino, half-African-American teenager is taking over the blue and red tights from Peter Parker, who was killed off recently. Marvel creators seized the opportunity to diversify the beloved American superhero series. Will comic enthusiasts come to love the new, multiethnic Spider-Man?

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Violence in Libya Rages as Rebel Factions Fight Qaddafi Loyalists

Monday, August 01, 2011

Days after the mysterious death of Libya's top rebel leader, opposition fighters staged an eight-hour gunfight with a group Qaddafi loyalists who were posing as another rebel brigade. Tensions within the rebels ranks suggest that there is not unity among the factions. These developments are are latest in a chaotic, confused, and violent situation. 

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Minnesota Ends 20-Day Government Shutdown

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Minnesota's state government is poised to re-open after an almost three-week shutdown.  Lawmakers agreed late in the night on a budget. It could mean some 22,000 state workers will return to work as soon as Thursday, and ends a political impasse between Democrat Governor Mark Dayton and Republican legislative leaders. So what's in the deal, and how will it affect taxpayers? 

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Serbia Captures War Criminal Goran Hadzic

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Serbian authorities say that have apprehended accused war criminal Goran Hadzic. Hadzic was the leader of Croatian Serb separatist forces and the last remaining fugitive sought by the UN war crimes tribunal at The Hague. In 2004, Hadzic was indicted with 14 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Marco Prelec, Balkans Project director of the International Crisis Group, explains why Hadzic was one of the most wanted men in the world.

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Moody's Mark Zandi: 'We Need to Raise the Debt Ceiling'

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Earlier this morning, credit ratings agency Moody's moved one step closer to downgrading the United States' Aaa rating when it announced the country's credit rating is under review. The move ramps up pressure on the White House and Congress to reach a deal on raising the nation's $14.3 trillion debt limit before August 2.

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Update from Kandahar: Karzai Funeral Bombing

Thursday, July 14, 2011

The Taliban is denying responsibility for a suicide bomb that took the lives of at least four people this morning at the funeral of Ahmed Wali Karzai, the half-brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai and a powerful leader in Kandahar. The BBC's Bilal Sawary is on the ground in Kandahar and has the latest updates on this developing story.

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New Police Technology Raises Privacy Concerns

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Starting this fall, law-enforcement agencies across the country will be outfitted with new devices that will make iPhones capable of scanning a person's face and matching it to a database of people with criminal records. The new facial-recognition technology, which is also able to collect fingerprints, has raised concerns with privacy advocates who say police who use the device may be conducting "searches" illegally without warrants. Julia Angwin wrote about the new devices in today's edition of The Wall Street Journal.

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Karzai's Half-Brother Killed in Kandahar

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Afghan President Hamid Karzai's half-brother, Ahmed Wali Karzai was shot dead at point blank range this morning in Kandahar. As provincial council chairman of Kandahar, Karzai was thought of as a stongman leader, and perhaps the most powerful man in southern Afghanistan. He was also a deeply controversial figure, believed to be involved in Afghanistan's drug trade and central to the corruption that has marred the Afghan government by American military commanders.

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Weak Jobs Numbers May Hinder Recovery

Friday, July 08, 2011

Job creation came to a near standstill in the month of June. New statistics out this morning from the Department of Labor show the economy added a scant 18,000 jobs last month, pushing the unemployment rate up to 9.2 percent — the fewest new hires in nine months.

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