Sarah Barringer Gordon

Sarah Barringer Gordon appears in the following:

SCOTUS Issues Major Rulings on Religion, Unions

Monday, June 30, 2014

Today was the last day of the Supreme Court's term, and the justices handed down two major decisions. The Court issued a partial blow to unions, and recognized for the first time the religious rights of business entities. 

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Do Corporations Have a Right to Religious Freedom?

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

The Supreme Court hears arguments today in a case that will determine whether for-profit corporations must provide insurance coverage for contraception.

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Church, State & the Supreme Court

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

The small town of GreeceNew York is thrust into the national spotlight this week as the Supreme Court hears arguments on whether the town’s council can open its meetings with Christian prayers. Sarah Barringer Gordon, professor of law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the Greece case and the historical role of religion in public life.

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Teenager Faces Public Outrage Over School Prayer Lawsuit

Thursday, February 02, 2012

Jessica Ahlquist, a 16-year-old-junior at Cranston High School West, is an outspoken atheist who believes that prayer should not be on display in public schools. Last month she expressed her views at school board hearings and a federal judge ruled in her favor deeming prayer's presence at Cranston High School to be unconstitutional. In retaliation, residents have threatened Ahlquist and others like State Representative Peter G. Palumbo have called her "an evil little thing." 

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American Values: Religion

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The United States, by some reckoning, is among the most consistently religious countries on earth. More of us go to a house of worship on a regular basis than in most countries. The majority of us believe in a higher power. And we have both more religions and a higher level of religious tolerance than anywhere else on the planet. But is religion really an American value? And if so, why has the separation of church and state been held so fundamental since the days of Thomas Jefferson?

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