Noah Shachtman

Foreign Policy magazine

Noah Shachtman appears in the following:

NSA Introduces New Plan To Prevent Leaks

Monday, August 12, 2013

General Keith Alexander said that the NSA plans to reduce the number of systems administrators by up to 90 percent. By limiting the number of people with access, Alexander says the leaking of sensitive information will be prevented. Noah Shachtman is Foreign Policy's executive editor for news and a fellow at the Brookings Institution. He joins us to discuss the role of a system administrator and whether this will actually help prevent leaks.

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The Iranian Government's Army of Spies

Wednesday, January 09, 2013

According to a new report, Iran’s spy agency, the Ministry of Intelligence and Security, is the most powerful and well-funded government agency in the country. Noah Shachtman, contributing editor for Wired Magazine and editor of its national security blog “Danger Room” explains how the MOIS became so powerful and what it uses its influence for.

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Taliban Target WikiLeaks Names

Friday, July 30, 2010

The WikiLeaks documents have far reaching consequences in Afghanistan. The Taliban claims that they are going to track down informants named in the WikiLeaks documents, putting many lives at risk. Also, the evidence that Pakistan has worked with the Taliban has emboldened the Afghan government to come out harshly against Pakistan.

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C.I.A and Google Invest in Web Monitoring Company

Friday, July 30, 2010

Google Ventures and In-Q-Tel, the investment arms of Google and the C.I.A., are both backing a start-up company called Recorded Future that monitors activity and text on the Web in real time and uses the information to spot early trends and events. The company also attempts to take current data and model what's going to happen in the future...

Google is not directly collaborating with the C.I.A., but its actions are likely to cause some unease for those already worried about whether the company can be trusted to protect consumers' privacy.

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