Mythili Rao

Associate Producer, The Takeaway

Mythili Rao appears in the following:

Coding Literacy is The Way of the Future

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects jobs in computer programming will grow by 12 percent from 2010 to 2020. Soon, we might all have to learn code—whether we want to or not. Manoush Zomorodi of WNYC's New Tech City explains why coding literacy is the way of the future. Ali Blackwell is one of the co-founder's of Decoded, which runs workshops to teach anyone to code. He discusses why coding is so important.

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How to Prepare a Drone for Commercial Use

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Big news for the world of drones came late last month when the FAA announced that it was authorizing sites in 10 states to carry out drone aircraft testing. One of the sites where testing will take place is Virginia Tech. Jon Greene is Interim Executive Director of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership which is leading testing for Virginia Tech. He explains how his team is preparing drones for commercial use.

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The Burglary That Exposed FBI Surveillance

Tuesday, January 07, 2014

On March 8, 1971, a small group of activists calling themselves the Citizens' Commission to Investigate the FBI staged a break-in of FBI offices in Media, Pennsylvania. The files they discovered there revealed that J. Edgar Hoover had authorized the wide-scale surveillance and intimidation of anti-war protesters and other dissident groups. Retro Report producer Bonnie Bertram looks back on that break-in and its consequences.

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Senate to Vote to Extend Unemployment Benefits

Monday, January 06, 2014

The Senate is back in session today and the House returns tomorrow. Though it’s a new year, much of what’s on the agenda is last year’s business. At the top of the list is a vote to extend unemployment insurance for the 1.3 million jobless workers who lost those benefits just after Christmas. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, provides a look ahead. 

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Blizzard is de Blasio's First Big Test - How'd he Do?

Friday, January 03, 2014

A winter storm settled in across the northeast and parts of the Midwest last night, affecting an estimated 100 million people nation wide. This nor'easter is also providing a test for some incoming and outgoing mayors. Joining The Takeaway to give an update on the storm from across the country are Andrea Bernstein, metro editor for WNYC; Phillip Martin, senior investigative reporter for our partner WGBH; and Quinn Klinefelter, senior news editor for WDET.

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'Tomorrow-Land': Examining The Cultural Impact of The 1964-65 World's Fair

Friday, January 03, 2014

Fifty years ago, New York City was a very different place when it hosted visitors from around the world for the World's Fair of 1964-65. Joseph Tirella, author of “Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World’s Fair and the Transformation of America,” examines how the 1964-65 World's Fair represented a changing United States, a country transfixed by technoogy and rapid transition.

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Colorado Retail Marijuana Sales Begin

Thursday, January 02, 2014

In the fall of 2012, Colorado voters approved the use, possession, and sale of small amounts of marijuana for adults above the age of 21. Yesterday that new measure fully took effect with dozens of marijuana retailers opening their doors to recreational customers for the first time. Dennis Huspeni, staff writer at the Denver Business Journal, joins The Takeaway to explain what the first day of business was like.

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Heightened Security in Russia After Attacks

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Across Russia, heightened security measures are in place after twin bombings in the city of Volgograd killed at least 32 people earlier in the week.  Meanwhile, around the world, Olympic athletes and fans and international official are wondering what implications, if any, those attacks might have on the Sochi winter Olympics.

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In Detroit, A Home for Writers

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

In the months since Detroit filed for bankruptcy, there’s been a lot of discussion over who or what it would take to repair the city.  A new nonprofit called Write A House has one novel idea: why not restore vacant houses and award them to low-income writers? Billy Collins, former United States poet laureate will be one of Write A House’s judges when the nonprofit starts accepting applications from working writers in the spring.

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What to Get the Kids? High Tech Toys that Teach

Friday, December 20, 2013

There are dozens of high-tech toys to pick from—battery-operated puppies, motorized wagons and so much more. But how do you actually pick out toys that have real educational value? Manoush Zomorodi, host and managing editor of WNYC's New Tech City, has a few ideas about how to get out of the iPad rut with tech toys. She shares her list of toys that teach, promote creativity, and build skills, while managing to be fun too.

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Views of the Middle from Across America

Thursday, December 19, 2013

This week, the U.S. Census Bureau released new data on median household income levels for every community across America. The Takeaway set out to find ordinary "median earners" from different Census tracts around the county—folks whose household income matches the median for their neighborhoods. Javes Cruthird of Florida; Tim Wood of Massachusetts; Margaret McGlynn of North Dakota; and Tanya Lundberg of Michigan, join The Takeaway to describe what it's like to live in the middle.

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"The Luminaries" Lights Up the Literary Skies

Thursday, December 19, 2013

"The Luminaries" is the fascinating new novel written by Eleanor Catton, the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner. Described by the New York Times as "doing a Charlotte Bronte-Themed crossword puzzle while playing chess and Dance Dance Revolution on a Bongo Board," the novel is wildly unique. Catton is the youngest person to win the Prize and only the second to win from New Zealand, and she joins The Takeaway to discuss the wild wave of enthusiasm for her work.

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The Meaning Behind Russia's Ukrainian 'Rescue'

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

After days of anti-government protests in Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced that his country would come to the aid of its neighbor to the tune of $15 billion. But the news of the deal was not enough to send protesters home. Borys Potapenko, Vice Chair of the International Conference in Support of Ukraine, has been closely monitoring the developments in Ukraine from Detroit.

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How to Make $1 Billion

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

If you had the good luck to play the S&P 500 absolutely perfectly, it would’ve been possible to transform a $1,000 investment into hundreds of billions of dollars in returns. How? David Yanofsky, reporter for Quartz, tells you how.

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The Second Life of Sherlock Holmes

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Sherlock Holmes' love for logic and sharp eye would go on to inspire mystery writers and real-life crime scene investigators alike. A new PBS documentary takes a look how Sherlock Holmes still informs the way we think and investigate real crimes, even today. What is about Holmes that inspires even modern investigators to cautiously and methodically look at the clues in order to solve a crime? Kimberlee Sue Moran, a forensic archaeologist featured in "How Sherlock Changed the World" explains.

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South Dakota Pleads for Farm Bill Extension

Friday, December 13, 2013

In October, an early blizzard killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota and Nebraska. Ordinarily after this kind of turmoil farmers can expect disaster relief funding through the Farm Bill—but this year that relief is in limbo. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the importance of the Farm Bill is Gary Cammack, a South Dakota Republican state representative and a rancher who lost more than 100 of his own cows and calves in the storm. 

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Gun Sales on the Rise a Year After Newtown

Friday, December 13, 2013

Tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of the Newtown, Connecticut shooting spree at Sandy Hook Elementary. The desire to prevent a tragedy of this scope from ever taking place again is one shared by many Americans. But a year later gun laws are no stricter, and gun sales are on the rise. Robert Draper, contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine, writes about the legislative battle over gun control in this week's magazine.

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What is Your Work Worth?

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Our work determines how we spend most of our days, the people we spend our time with, the kind of lifestyle we can afford, and it influences our fundamental sense of who we are. It turns out that what we're paid and how we really feel about our jobs aren't always in sync. Al Gini, a professor of Business Ethics at Loyola University’s School of Business Administration and resident philosopher at WBEZ, has dedicated much of his career to understanding the value of work. He’s also the author of “My Job My Self." 

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The Case Against Nukes, Even in Peacetime

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

About 62 percent of Americans think no nation should have a nuclear arsenal—not even the U.S. Globally, the world's nuclear powers have 17,000 weapons combined—a number that's growing. Joe Cirincione is president of Ploughshares Fund and author of "Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late." In his new book, he argues that the proliferation of nuclear weapons poses a real threat to us all—even in times of safety and peace. 

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What's in Store for Mary T. Barra at General Motors?

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Automaker General Motors tapped a new leader this week. The company’s newest CEO, Mary T. Barra, will be the first woman to lead GM. She inherits a company that’s no longer in big financial trouble, but GM’s biggest challenges are likely to be conceptual. Jaclyn Trop, an automotive reporter for our partner The New York Times based in Detroit, tells The Takeaway what's in store for Barra.

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