Mark Bittman

Cookbook author and New York Times food writer

Mark Bittman appears in the following:

Gourmet Magazine Closes After Seven Decades

Tuesday, October 06, 2009

Conde Nast announced yesterday that it will close Gourmet magazine after nearly 69 years of taste making and recipe writing. The November issue will be its last. The decision came after a three-month study by McKinsey & Co., which looked at cutting the publishing company's costs. Along with Gourmet, Conde Nast is closing Cookie, Modern Bride and Elegant Bride. The magazine, headed by longtime editor-in-chief Ruth Reichl, has been a gourmet bible for many young chefs and foodies. Joining us to talk about the demise of the magazine is chef and author Mark Bittman.

“It is a tragedy from an editorial point of view, because it was place where probably the most serious food journalism was being done on a regular basis."
—Chef and author Mark Bittman on closing of Gourmet magazine after 69 years of publication.

Comment

Should You Get Off the Hook? The Ethics of Eating Fish

Monday, June 08, 2009

Food writer Mark Bittman's first book, "Fish: The Complete Guide to Buying and Cooking," explored the glory of piscine cuisine. But when offered the opportunity to revise the book, he declined. Overnight shipping of loads of fish cargo, farm-raising and over-fishing have turned buying and eating fish into an ethical and ecological quagmire. Mark Bittman joins The Takeaway to explain his reasons for being more selective about which fish end up on his plate.

Comments [2]

Mark Bittman is thinking outside the (cereal) box for breakfast

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Trouble viewing this video? Check out the YouTube version (click "watch in high quality" for best quality).

Mark Bittman had one thought on breakfast: YAWNNN! So he decided to shake things up and started serving up breakfast items you would more closely associate with dinner. Things like black olives, miso, dried tomatoes, bok choy, and roasted carrots. Mark Bittman joins us with a stirring defense for serving wheat berries with soy sauce.

Listen to the full Takeaway segment with Mark Bittman here
Read More

Comment

Mark Bittman is thinking outside the (cereal) box for breakfast

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Trouble viewing this video? Check out the YouTube version (click "watch in high quality" for best quality).

Mark Bittman had one thought on breakfast: YAWNNN! So he decided to shake things up and started serving up breakfast items you would more closely associate with dinner. Things like black olives, miso, dried tomatoes, bok choy, and roasted carrots. Mark Bittman joins us with a stirring defense for serving wheat berries with soy sauce. Want a recipe? If you insist:

Wheat Berries With Sesame, Soy Sauce and Scallions

• 1 1/2 cups wheat berries
• Salt
• 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil, or to taste
• 2 tablespoons soy sauce, or to taste
• 1/2 cup trimmed and chopped scallions.

1. In a 4- to 6-cup saucepan, combine wheat berries with a large pinch of salt and enough water to cover them by at least an inch. Bring to a boil and adjust heat so mixture bubbles gently.

2. Cook, stirring occasionally, until wheat berries are tender, about 35 to 45 minutes. Add boiling water as necessary to keep wheat berries covered and to keep them from drying out as they swell and become tender. Wheat berries are done when tender with a slight bite to them; ideally you will have cooked out all the water at about the same time they are tender, but if any remains, strain them. (At this point you can drain berries and refrigerate for up to a few days, then reheat when ready to serve.)

3. Fluff wheat berries with a fork and toss with sesame oil. To serve, drizzle with soy sauce and garnish with scallions.

Yield: 4 servings.

For more of Mark Bittman on breakfast, read his article, Your Morning Pizza in today's New York Times.

Comments [3]

The Minimalist saves the planet

Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Guest: Mark Bittman, The New York Times

Comment