Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of 'The Snowy Day'

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

In 1961, Ezra Jack Keats wrote and illustrated his first children’s book. It was called "The Snowy Day" and it told the story of Peter, a young, African-American boy in Brooklyn, enjoying the season's first snowfall. The book was immediately popular. Prior to its publication, no other mainstream children’s book had featured a black hero in a non-caricatured way.

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Movie Date Podcast: 'Man on a Ledge'

Friday, January 27, 2012

Like "Snakes on a Plane" before it "Man on a Ledge" tells you exactly what to expect out of this thriller. There's a man, of course, and he is on a ledge. But what he's doing there, how he will get off, and what happens in between? We won't spoil the plot for you but our Movie Date podcasters will put this movie in context of other "literal-title movies" and let you know if it is a good date or not. As always we hear from Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, and Kristen Meinzer, culture producer for the Takeaway.

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New Movie Releases: 'The Grey' and 'Man on a Ledge'

Friday, January 27, 2012

Late January means as many action releases as June and July. Liam Neeson returns to the big screen this weekend with the icy survival flick "The Grey." This Friday also sees "Man on a Ledge," starring Sam Worthington as a police psychologist negotiating with a pack of diamond thieves, whilst on a ledge of course. Find out which flicks are worth seeing, and which ones should wait until DVD release.

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Wealth, Presidents, and Being 'Out of Touch'

Thursday, January 26, 2012

Although his father was the first candidate to release their tax returns, the impetus for Massachussetts governor Mitt Romney making his financial life public — and the rallying cry of Gingrich-boosting Super PACs — is the assertion that Romney is too rich and therefore too out of touch to be president. Throughout the decades, Americans have elected very wealthy men to the White House without any fanfare. Yet with record rates of unemployment that many are experiencing over a period of years, the issue of class in the U.S. has gained a new significance.

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Can Anyone Resurrect 'Made in the USA'?

Thursday, January 26, 2012

The main focus of Tuesday’s State of the Union address was the economy and income inequality. Along with his ideas about taxation and protecting homeowners, president Obama also expressed a desire to bring manufacturing jobs back to the U.S. Since the 1980s, the U.S. economy has shifted away from manufacturing and towards intellectual property and services. This has been due in part to the perceived expenses involved in production based in the U.S., as well as labor laws. 

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The Rise of the Glock: America's Gun

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

In the early 1980s, a 50-year-old radiator manufacturer who'd never made a gun before was given the opportunity to make some for the Austrian army. His name was Gaston Glock, and the gun that bears his name has gained a ubiquitous presence both on-screen and in real-life crimes over the past 25 years. Made mostly of plastic and consisting fewer parts, the glock is lighter and easier to handle than other handguns — making it "amateur-friendly."

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The President's Transportation Transformation

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

A year ago President Obama announced his plans for high speed rail lines and other cutting edge transportation for the nation. But after many defeats in Congress, including the de-funding of high-speed rail, the President’s transportation initiative suddenly seems less futuristic and more focused on rebuilding the old highways of the past. 

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The 23-Year-Old Treasurer of Harrisburg, PA

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Most college students don’t find much time in between classes, studying, and planning their own futures to solve major problems in their local communities. But when Harrisburg, Pennsylvania found itself on the brink of bankruptcy, a college student saved the day. The 23-year-old John Campbell is also the city’s treasurer. He was elected to the post on January 3 and has a step-by-step plan to save the state capital from financial collapse.

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The Daily Show's Wyatt Cenac on 'AfroPoP: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange'

Friday, January 20, 2012

Wyatt Cenac is best known as "The Daily Show" correspondent behind popular segments like "Black to the Future" and "Rapper or Republican." When he is not working for "The Daily Show," Cenac’s is acting and performing as a stand-up comedian. His current project, hosting the fourth season of "AfroPoP: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange," is a documentary series profiling men and women from across the African Diaspora — including California punk band Fishbone, a 26-year-old solar energy entrepreneur in Mali, and a minister’s daughter who plays calypso music.

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Movie Date Podcast: Steven Soderbergh Goes 'Haywire'

Friday, January 20, 2012

In Steven Soderbergh's latest movie, the "Ocean's Eleven" director recruits mixed martial arts fighter Gina Carano to play the heroine in the action-packed "Haywire." Both the director and actor joined The Takeaway to talk about their unlikely pairing for Carano's first movie. Now we hear about the movie from Movie Date podcasters Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, and Kristen Meinzer, culture producer for the Takeaway.

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'Haywire' Director Steven Soderbergh with Star of Film, Gina Carano

Friday, January 20, 2012

Steven Soderbergh is a director who is not afraid to try new things. His films range from a remake of the popular rat pack vehicle "Ocean’s Eleven" to the multi-part biopic “Che” to his experimental film "Scizopolis." On Friday his latest risky endeavor, "Haywire," hits theaters. Newcomer Gina Carano stars as a mixed martial arts fighter who seeks revenge after being betrayed during a mission.

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Redefining Autism: How it Could Change Treatment and Policy

Friday, January 20, 2012

The Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) is a dictionary that defines and classifies all mental health disorders. First published in 1952, the DSM is used by everyone from clinicians to pharmaceutical companies to policy makers. Since its inception, the DSM has been revised only four times — one such occasion was in 1980 when homosexuality was no longer defined as a mental disorder. In the fifth edition, another big change may come to the DSM. Autism is up for a redefinition which could potentially reduce the number of people considered "autistic" by half.

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'Pina' Director Wim Wenders: What Dance Taught Him About Life

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Acclaimed director Wim Wenders, of past successes like "The Buena Vista Social Club," and "Wings of Desire," talks about the process of creating "Pina," his new film about the legendary choreographer Pina Bausch. Wenders was first inspired by Bausch 25 years ago when he watched her perform an emotional double-bill that made him cry. As a result, Wenders collaborated with Bausch for twenty years to develop the concept for the movie, but unfortunately the choreographer died before he ever began filming.

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The Battle Over History Curriculum in Schools

Thursday, January 19, 2012

Two conversations this week on the sensitivity of certain subjects in the classroom produced lots of reaction from listeners. A ban on ethnic studies in Tuscon Arizona, and a resistance to teaching Climate Change as an accepted body of knowledge in certain school districts around the country raises a broader question. Are there pieces of history and science that are simply too hot to handle in a classroom where active debate may get away from the truth and consensus on what to teach may be hard to find?

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The Bioethics of Denying Patients Organ Transplants

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Three-year-old Amelia Rivera has a rare genetic disease called Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome. She suffers from mental impairment, epileptic-like seizures, and she can't walk or talk. Besides her illness she's in desperate need of a kidney transplant to live to see her fourth birthday. But the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where Amelia is treated, told Amelia’s family that they would not perform a transplant even if a family member donates a kidney. The reason, according to her mother's blog, is because she is “mentally retarded.”

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Former Liberian Dictator Charles Taylor Worked for US Spy Agencies

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Former Liberian president Charles Taylor is infamous for many atrocities. As one of the first African leaders to be tried for war crimes, Taylor was a notorious dictator who oversaw the murder of over one million people. He was also an active participant in the diamonds-for-guns trade, and at one point gifted Naomi Campbell a pouch of blood diamonds. Monday the Boston Globe revealed that during his rise as a ruthless despot, Taylor worked with U.S. spy agencies like the CIA and Pentagon since the early 1980s.

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Golden Globes: 'Descendants,' Claire Danes, and Ricky Gervais

Monday, January 16, 2012

Last night was the 69th annual Golden Globe Awards and once again Ricky Gervais played host. Gervais did what he does, a little more gently this time around. The stars were out, well Winner Woody Allen didn't show, but it was a party as usual. Here to weigh in are our Movie Date team, Rafer Guzman, who's also movie critic for Newsday and his co-host Kristen Meinzer, who's also culture producer for the Takeaway.

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Movie Date: Golden Globes

Saturday, January 14, 2012

The Golden Globe awards are Sunday. Who will come out as Hollywood's big winner? Who will look stunning on the red carpet? And who will flame out? Find out what Takeaway Movie Date podcasters Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer think about the winners and losers. Have any favorites, or movies that you think we're overrated? Let us know here or call us at 1-877-8-MY-TAKE.

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Movie Date: The First Big Movies of 2012

Friday, January 13, 2012

After the December onslaught of Oscar-hopefuls and arthouse faire, two star-powered crowd-pleasers open this week: "Contraband" and "Joyful Noise." The latter sees the big-screen return of Dolly Parton after a decade, and the former promises big-budget CGI thrills from Mark Wahlberg. But whether or not the year's first popcorn flicks deliver on their excitement and laughter remains to be seen.

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Movie Date Podcast: 'Joyful Noise' and 'Contraband'

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Chic Flicks and Dude Flicks released on the same day? It happens this week as Mark Wahlberg packs heat and battles bad guys in the new thriller "Contraband." Also being released is "Joyful Noise," a musical starring the dynamic duo of Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah. Which movie will please both genders, and more importantly, which makes a good movie date? Takeaway Movie Date podcasters Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer tell us about what movies you might want to take your spouse to, and which one you should see alone.

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