Kristen Meinzer

Kristen Meinzer appears in the following:

Remembering Dick Clark

Thursday, April 19, 2012

Yesterday, Dick Clark passed away. But the stamp he left on the world is still very much apparent. We remember him today with two people who know his story well. John Jackson is the author of “American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock 'n' Roll Empire.” And Lew Klein was the executive producer of American Bandstand, who hired Dick Clark fresh out of college.

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Do Colombians Care About the Secret Service Prostitution Scandal?

Thursday, April 19, 2012

The Secret Service prostitution scandal in Cartagena, Colombia has dominated U.S. headlines and attracted responses from a number of high-profile Americans including the president himself. Obama said last weekend: "If it turns out that some of the allegations made in the press are confirmed, then of course I'll be angry." But what do Colombians think of the whole scandal? Miriam Wells is managing editor with Colombia Reports in Colombia.

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Smartphones Are Bringing Us Together and Tearing Us Apart

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Chances are you use email. If you’re like 88 percent of Americans, you also own a cell phone. And if you’re among the well-connected 46 percent, you check your email ON your cell phone. All of this can make us feel more connected. But it can also make us less connected to those who are sitting right next to us. And it can be addictive. What to do?

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Julian Assange: The Next Oprah?

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

 

From Oprah to Piers Morgan, the world loves a good talk show. And if the multiple seasons of Celebrity Apprentice have taught us anything, audiences also love reality TV shows featuring pseudo celebrities. Yesterday, a program premiered that’s a tiny bit of both. Entitled "The World Today," the new talk show is hosted by Julian Assange, the man most famous for founding WikiLeaks. Alessandra Stanley, television critic for The New York Times, watched the first episode of "The World Today." She shares her thoughts on whether Assange might be the next Ellen, or just another candidate for Celebrity Big Brother.

 

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Sharia Law: What It Is, What It Isn't

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

In the news, Sharia law is frequently depicted as a system that condones women being stoned. In the movies, it’s the reason why petty thieves find their hands on the chopping block. But what, exactly, is Sharia law all about? Sadakat Kadri, author of "Heaven on Earth," a history of Sharia law and its many interpretations, explains.

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The 2012 Pulitzers, and What They Say About News

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Ninety-five years ago, the very first Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism were awarded to a few good newspapers. And, of course, back then, it was all black and white newsprint. But a lot has changed since 1917. Explaining how news — and news awards — are shifting with the times, is Sig Gissler, who has been the Pulitzer Prize administrator since 2002. He’s also a journalism professor at Columbia University.

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Avoiding War with China Through Cyber War Games

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

When we hear the words "war games," many of us think of the 1983 blockbuster starring Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy. In the film "War Games", suspicions of computer technology collide with cold war fears to tell a parable in which the lesson is that no one wins in a game of war. But can war games actually help us avoid war? James Lewis thinks so.

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Jackie Robinson's Legacy

Monday, April 16, 2012

For today's sports fans, it’s hard to imagine professional teams segregated by color. That changed 65 years ago when Jack Roosevelt Robinson, the son of Georgia sharecroppers, joined the Brooklyn Dodgers to become the first African-American in major league baseball. American sports have come a long way since 1947, but maybe not far enough. This season, just over eight percent of professional baseball players are black. That's less than half of what it was in 1959, when the last team was integrated. Are we living up to or failing Jackie Robinson's legacy? Author of "Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson’s First Season", Jonathan Eig, explains.

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Virginia Tech, Five Years Later

Monday, April 16, 2012

Today marks five years since Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured 25 others at Virginia Tech, making it the deadliest American shooting in history. Heavy media coverage has depicted an uptick in school shootings in recent years, but violence in American schools has been a problem for a long time. Rebecca Coffey, a science journalist for Scientific American and Discover Magazine, joins us to discuss: What have we learned since Virginia Tech?

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Can Zimmerman Get a Fair Trial?

Friday, April 13, 2012

Could all the public attention affect George Zimmerman’s right to a fair trial? It’s a question that Wendy Kaminer has been mulling over. Kaminer is a lawyer, social critic, and correspondent at The Atlantic. She’s also the author of eight books, including “Worst Instincts: Cowardice, Conformity, and the ACLU.”

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Movie Date: Film as Political Propaganda

Friday, April 13, 2012

Heavy stuff this week. "October Baby" tells the story of a woman's discovery that her mother almost aborted her. Intended or not, the movie's politics — see what happens when you don't have an abortion? — align comfortably with those of the religious Right. Likewise, the recent film "The Lorax" and 2006's "Happy Feet" decry the ills of global warming in a quintessentially liberal parlance. But not all movies have agendas, right?

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New Movie Releases: 'Cabin in the Woods,' 'Three Stooges,' 'Lockout'

Friday, April 13, 2012

Three big movies out today: the horror movie “Cabin in the Woods,” the Farrelly brothers long-awaited “Three Stooges,” and the action movie “Lockout,” starring Guy Pierce. Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer, our Movie Date team, are here as usual. In addition to hosting the podcast, Rafer is film critic for Newsday and Kristen is culture producer for the Takeaway.

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Morgan Spurlock on 'Comic-Con Episode IV'

Friday, April 13, 2012

Back in 1970, in the city of San Diego, a small group of comic book fans decided to organize a convention. Their dream was to attract 500 fans. In the end, however, only 300 showed up. But the organizers didn’t give up. Over 40 years later, San Diego Comic-Con International attracts 130,000 attendees each year. Morgan Spurlock takes a closer look at these die-hard fans, and the mother of all comic book conventions in his new movie, which hits theatres today. It’s called “Comic-Con Episode IV.”

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Should 911 Calls Be Released to the Public?

Friday, April 13, 2012

The Trayvon Martin case caught national attention after the release of the 911 calls George Zimmerman made to police just before the shooting. Those recordings have played a major role in shaping public opinion, throwing into doubt whether Zimmerman will get a fair trial. Sonny Brasfield is executive director of the Association of County Commissions of Alabama. He helped draft the 2010 legislation that made Alabama the first state to bar the release of 911 recordings. Wendy Kaminer is a lawyer, social critic and contributing editor at The Atlantic.

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George Zimmerman Charged with Second Degree Murder: What Now?

Thursday, April 12, 2012

It has been 46 days since 17-year-old Trayvon Martin was shot and killed in Sanford, Florida, yet it will be months before there is any resolution in the case. Although second degree murder charges have been filed against the man who admits to shooting Trayvon, but it could be eight months or more before a jury is convened and the trial begins. What happens in the meantime? Valerie Houston is a Pastor at Allen Chapel AME Church in Sanford, Florida, and Farai Chideya is a journalist and blogger at Farai.com.

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Zimmerman in Police Custody, Charged with Second Degree Murder

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Last night in a press conference, Florida state special prosecutor Angela Corey announced the charges filed against George Zimmerman for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin on February 26. Zimmerman was arrested yesterday on charges of second degree murder. Adam Kaeloha Causey, a reporter with the Florida Times Union, attended last night's press conference. Dale Carson is a lawyer and retired legal instructor for the FBI, and joins us to discuss the legal explanation behind Zimmerman's arrest.

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The Rise of Medical Tourism

Thursday, April 12, 2012

This year, hundreds of thousands of Americans will travel abroad, not to see ancient ruins or visit historic sites, but to undergo affordable medical care. These medical tourists will go to Mexico, Thailand, Costa Rica and elsewhere for everything from root canals to hip replacements. And while this type of tourism has been around for decades, it’s become more and more popular as health-care costs in the U.S. continue to rise. Paul Vehorn is a behavioral psychologist who’s visited Thailand for two different procedures, and James Surowiecki is a journalist with the New Yorker who explores what the bigger economic implications of medical tourism might be in his article entitled “Club Med.”

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George Zimmerman in Custody and Charged with Second Degree Murder

Thursday, April 12, 2012

Last night at 6pm, Florida state special prosecutor Angela Corey announced that George Zimmerman had been charged with second degree murder in the Trayvon Martin case.

In addition to stating the charges, she also announced that George Zimmerman was in state custody, and responded to questions from the journalists.

Among the journalists there was Adam Kealoha Causey, a reporter with the Florida Times Union.

And offering a legal interpretation on last night’s press conference is Dale Carson, a lawyer, retired legal instructor for the FBI, and a former police officer.

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Santorum Suspends Campaign

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Despite his best efforts, Santorum always seemed to be two steps behind the Republican front-runner, Mitt Romney. And yesterday, he announced that he’d no longer try to catch up. Weighing in on Santorum's decision are Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Ron Christie, Takeaway contributor and Republican political strategist, and Karen Martin, organizer of Spartanburg Tea Party, who previously told us she was hoping for "anyone but Romney" but now her perspective has changed.

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Mitt Romney Minus Rick Santorum

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Rick Santorum has suspended his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, leaving an essentially two-man race between Romney and Obama. Moving forward, what will the Republican, Mitt Romney, do to win the support of Rick Santorum’s supporters? And as President Obama directs his attacks toward the Republican front-runner, what strategy will he have to enlist?

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