Jillian Weinberger

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Will the Pope Change his Mind on Divorce?

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

For 500 years, the Catholic Church denied communion to parishioners who divorce and remarry. But this week, Pope Francis may chart a new course, breaking ranks with his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, who refused to allow for pastoral discretion on the issue. James Carroll is the author of "An American Requiem: God, My Father, and the War that Came Between Us" and "Toward A New Catholic Church: The Promise of Reform." He examines the choices facing Pope Francis regarding marriage and the future of the Catholic Church. 

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Reimagining the Politics of Evangelical Christians

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

After generations of Evangelical Christians moving further towards the right, many found that their partisan politics were pushing people away. Now, a new generation of young leaders are calling for change and more moderation. Brandan Robertson, founder of The Revangelical Movement, an organization that promotes an alternative Evangelical perspective and Krista Tippett, host of On Being, join us to discuss the changing face of Evangelicals. 

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President: From the Origins of the Word to a Crazy Rabbit Attack

Monday, February 17, 2014

In honor of President's Day, we take two historical looks at the American presidency. First Mark Forsyth looks back at the word's humble origins and traces just how it came to have the heft it has today. The second recounts how a small angry mammal changed the course of history. WNYC reporter Jim O'Grady says that President Jimmy Carter's bizarre encounter with a crazed swimming rabbit on a Georgia lake crystallized an emerging sense that Carter was a man in over his head.

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The Truth About Netflix's 'House of Cards'

Monday, February 17, 2014

Early Friday morning, Netflix released the entire second season of its show "House of Cards." Though Netflix refuses to release the viewership numbers, when looking at the hype online, and the estimates by one internet provider that 15 percent of their Netflix subscribers watched the show over the weekend, it's safe to say that the show is a hit. But just how realistic is the show about a corrupt majority whip? A real former whip—Congressman David Bonior—joins us today to share his insights.

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Can You Trust The Media?

Monday, February 17, 2014

Over the last few years, technology has transformed how we understand and consume the news. A few decades ago, most of us read the morning paper or tuned in to the evening news, but those habits have changed with the growth of the internet and cable. As the news audience splinters, author Alain de Botton worries that the public isn't getting the whole picture. In his new book, "The News: A User's Manual," he argues that we need better training on how to consume and decode the news.

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The Biology of Intimacy & Making Love Last

Friday, February 14, 2014

How do we make love last? Helen Fisher, biological anthropologist and professor at the Center for Human Evolution Studies at Rutgers, explains her recent research on the scientific underpinnings of long-lasting romance. The Takeaway also gets relationship advice from one couple, Jack Connelly and Bob Gaither, who began dating 37 years ago, in the late 1970s. At that time, they truly defied the odds as a gay couple and an interracial couple. They share their story, along with the relationship lessons they've learned over the past few decades together.

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U.S. Looks to Target American With Drone

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

The U.S. government has identified an American citizen who is a member of al-Qaida and is actively planning attacks against Americans overseas. The administration is debating whether to kill him with a drone strike and how to do so legally. When, if ever, is it appropriate to use a drone strike to kill an American citizen abroad? Karen Greenberg, Director of the Center on National Security at Fordham Law School, examines this question and the future of the U.S. drone program.

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How They Do That: Curling

Monday, February 10, 2014

The 2014 Sochi Olympics are in full swing, and today The Takeaway kicks off its series, "How Do They Do That?," on the scientific dynamics behind the winter games. All week, Eric Goff, physics professor at Lynchburg College and author of "Gold Medal Physics: The Science of Sports," will serve as The Takeaway's Olympic physicist, explaining the physics that push humans to their most extreme limits. Today, Goff looks at the physics behind curling with Brady Clark, reigning national curling champion.

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Is Facebook the Best Place to Archive our Memories?

Friday, February 07, 2014

Since Facebook celebrated its tenth anniversary earlier this week, hundreds of millions of users have created their own "look-back" movies, a one-minute-long reflection on a user's most-liked posts and pictures since the site began. Researcher Sherry Turkle, professor of Science Technology and Society at MIT, explores Facebook's affect on how we perceive identity and memory.

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An Inside Look at the History of Sochi

Thursday, February 06, 2014

On the eve of the Opening Ceremony, so much attention of the attention on the Winter Olympics has focused on security and internal domestic policies in Russia. Putting all that aside, what does the global community really know about Sochi, the city that we’ll all be watching for the next two weeks? Charles King, Professor of International Affairs and Government at Georgetown University and author of the book, "The Ghost of Freedom: A History of the Caucuses" explains why this region and its proximity to the Black Sea has been so important for Russia.

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Keystone XL Pipeline: The Local Perspective

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Over the last few months, the Keystone XL pipeline has become a national controversy. While environmental groups protest the pipeline's expansion from Cushing, Oklahoma to Alberta, Canada, Congressional Republicans are pushing for the Obama Administration's approval. With the national debate in the headlines, The Takeaway hears from three reporters to examine the impact of the proposed pipeline. Mose Buchele, a state impact reporter for KUT in Austin, Texas; Katie Schubert, news director for KIOS Omaha, and Joe Wertz, a state impact reporter in Norman, Oklahoma, weigh in.

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We're Having Another Heroin Epidemic

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Some researchers are tying the rise in heroin use to tighter restrictions on prescription opiates like Oxycotin and Vicodin.

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An Inside Look at Death Penalty Decisions

Friday, January 31, 2014

Yesterday the Justice Department announced that it will pursue capital punishment for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the man accused of plotting and executing the Boston Marathon bombings. Should Tsarvaev be ultimately sentenced to death? It would mark the most significant death penalty case since Timothy McVeigh, the man behind the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Vicki Behenna, a former assistant U.S. attorney for Oklahoma, helped prosecute Timothy McVeigh. She joins The Takeaway to explain how the federal government pursues the death penalty.

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With New Leader, Will Change Come to the NSA?

Thursday, January 30, 2014

National Security Agency director Keith Alexander is preapring to step down in March, and according to reports, President Barack Obama is interviewing Alexander's potential successor himself. If he is confirmed by the Senate, Navy cryptologist and Vice Admiral Mike Rogers will take the helm of the NSA as the agency faces renewed public scrutiny. Rogers's former colleague John Nagl, a retired Lieutenant Colonel, counterinsurgency expert and headmaster of the Haverford School, discusses the Vice Admiral's resume and how he might change the NSA.

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Big Block of Cheese Day: From Andrew Jackson to 'West Wing' to Obama

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

In the first season of "The West Wing," the White House hosts an open house for "Big Block of Cheese Day," a nod to President Jackson, who hosted a similar event for the American people. This year, the Obama Administration has adopted the tradition. Today the White House is hosting a virtual "Big Block of Cheese Day" over social media. Eli Attie, writer and producer for "The West Wing," discusses the tradition, from the Jacksonian Era to the fictional Bartlet Administration to the Obama White House today.

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The State of the Union Through an Artist's Eyes

Monday, January 27, 2014

Artist, composer and performer R. Luke DuBois developed his signature style through data mining. In his 2008 piece, "Hindsight is Always 20/20," DuBois isolates the most frequently mentioned words from State of the Union Addresses that span from George Washington to George W. Bush. As President Barack Obama prepares for the 2014 State of the Union Address, DuBois examines word patterns in State of the Union Addresses over time, and describes how a president's rhetoric reflects their era.

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Takeaway To Do List: Obama's State of The Union

Monday, January 27, 2014

In advance of the State of the Union on Tuesday, we're creating a Takeaway to do list called "SOTU To Do,"—and we need your help. What should be on Obama's to do list? Tweet us @TheTakeaway using #SOTUToDo and we'll make our own, listener-sponsored to do list for the president. But first, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich examines the topics President Barack Obama will likely cover on Tuesday.

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NC Leads the Way in Cutting Aid for the Jobless

Thursday, January 23, 2014

At the end of last year as the federal government allowed long-term unemployment benefits to expire for 1.3 million Americans, and North Carolina led the way in also reducing benefits. Paul Tine is a North Carolina state representative that voted for the unemployment cuts. Jaslyn Roberts is the career center director for Charlotte Works, a job training organization. Together they explain how things have changed in the state since benefits have been cut.

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'Agony and Horror' in Ohio Execution

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

The case of Dennis McGuire has raised questions about the future of death penalty execution in the United States. Ohio officials executed McGuire last Thursday, through a new, two-drug, lethal injection protocol. Eyewitness accounts indicate that McGuire suffered excruciating pain before he died. David Waisel served as an expert witness for McGuire's defense team, and he testified that McGuire would suffer "pain and agony" before he died. By all accounts, he was right.

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Bill and Melinda Gates on the Myths of Poverty

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Since launching their foundation in 2000, Bill and Melinda Gates have granted nearly $30 billion to organizations and individuals working to eradicate poverty. In an interview on Tuesday with Takeaway host John Hockenberry, the couple talk about why poor countries aren't doomed to stay poor.

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