Jillian Weinberger

Associate Producer

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

Glenn Greenwald: The U.S. Is Not Safer Since 9/11

Monday, December 16, 2013

“I think what we did made the threat much, much worse, and at the same time, destroyed many of the freedoms that we’ve all been taught define what the United States is all about,” says the investigative journalist.

Comments [32]

After Sandy Hook, Grade Schools Prioritize Safety

Friday, December 13, 2013

One of the things that ran through many of our minds after the tragedy of Sandy Hook was, "How could this happen—at an elementary school?" Now school doors have been locked. Shades have been drawn. Teachers are now equal parts protectors and educators. Joining The Takeaway to talk about the changing sense of safety and shelter in elementary schools is Lindsay Gerakaris, a fourth grade teacher at P.S. 124 in New York City.

Comments [3]

The 'New Rich' and What It Means to be Wealthy

Thursday, December 12, 2013

"A lot of these people are people who had one good year," says Harvard Business Professor Michael Norton on Americans considered "rich."

Comments [2]

Ouster in North Korea Leaves World Watching

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

On Monday, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un ousted his uncle and mentor Jang Song-thaek from office, for what the ruling party described as “criminal acts that baffle imagination." Joining The Takeaway to weigh in on the significance of this disruption to the reclusive state’s power structure is Thomas Hubbard, former Ambassador to South Korea from 2001 to 2004 and chairman of the Korea Society.

Comments [2]

The Economic Impact of the Volcker Rule

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

This week, financial regulatory agencies officially approved the Volcker Rule, passed as the centerpiece of the Dodd-Frank Act in June 2010. Kathryn Wylde, Deputy Chair of the Board of the Federal Reserve of New York, compares the final iteration of the Volcker Rule to what Volcker originally devised, and describes how the Rule might influence the U.S.'s economic future. 

Comments [4]

How Much Power Should the E.P.A. Have?

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Today the Supreme Court hears arguments in the case Environmental Protection Agency vs. EME Homer City Generation. At the heart of the case is the question of who has the power to act on issues of controlling environmental hazards. Jeff Holmstead is a former assistant administrator for the E.P.A. who is now an attorney with the firm Bracewell and Giuliani. While the Obama Administration defends the E.P.A.'s right to regulation, Holmstead disagrees. 

Comments [2]

The Battle for the Future of the N.S.A.

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Revelations by former N.S.A. contractor Edward Snowden have set of a fierce debate over national security and personal privacy, and the debate has become particularly intense for the Senate Intelligence Committee itself. Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, discusses the past, present and possible future of the N.S.A. in his piece that appears in the latest issue of the magazine.

Comments [2]

The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

Comments [4]

The Road Ahead for Syria & the OPCW

Monday, December 09, 2013

On Tuesday, the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons will accept their Nobel Peace Prize in Stockholm. Last month, they triumphantly met their deadline for the removal of Syria’s weapons cache. Though much progress has been made, there is still a great deal of work left to be done. Sigrid Kaag, special coordinator of the joint mission of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations, provides a look ahead at the OPCW's timeline for destroying all of the weapons.

Comment

How to Combat Poverty: Lessons from History

Monday, December 09, 2013

As the president and Congress debate the minimum wage and the efficacy of food stamps, a new book by Dr. Mical Raz challenges the underpinnings of our understanding of poverty and how best to combat it. In "What's Wrong with the Poor?: Psychiatry, Race and the War on Poverty," Dr. Raz argues that the theory of deprivation—which drove the Johnson Administration's approach to policy-making—led policy-makers to ignore structural inequality.

Comments [4]

Can Obama's Inequality Message Win Back Millennials?

Thursday, December 05, 2013

President Barack Obama has revived his populist message and made a case for the Affordable Care Act as a vehicle to reduce income inequality. Jonathan Alter, journalist and author of "The Center Holds: Obama and his Enemies," explores the president's rebranding efforts. He notes that as Obama dusts off his brand of populism, his core base—millennials—seems to be abandoning him. Heather McGhee, vice president of policy and outreach at Demos, examines how the President's message about income inequality resonate with the youngest voters.

Comments [3]

As the U.S. Pivots to Asia, China Reasserts Its Influence

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

As the U.S. attempts its "pivot" to Asia, a region of growing economic power with potential new markets for American products, Chinese authorities are pushing back, claiming a new air defense identification zone in international air space. Peter Dutton is a professor and director of the China Maritime Studies Institute at the U.S. Naval War College. He explains that China is pressuring its neighbors and U.S. economic allies. Also joining the program is Nancy Soderberg, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, who examines American influence in the region.

Comments [1]

Is the Constitution to Blame for D.C. Gridlock?

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

The American Constitution is the world's oldest still in use, but even Thomas Jefferson believed that all constitutions should expire. Jeffrey Toobin, attorney and staff writer for The New Yorker, writes persuasively in this week's magazine that the Constitution may be to blame for the gridlock in Congress. Toobin discusses liberal and conservative critiques of the Constitution, and explores why our founding document may still result in the world's best government.

Comments [5]

New Indictments Reopen Old Wounds in Steubenville

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

In August 2012, a 16-year-old girl from a town in West Virginia, just across the Ohio River, accused two sophomore starters on the Steubenville High School football team of rape. A judge declared the two underage boys delinquent of rape, the juvenile guilty charge, last March. The investigation didn't end there. This week, a special grand jury handed down four adult indictments related to the case,  for the school superintendent, a former volunteer assistant football coach and two teachers. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine discusses the charges, and examines the fallout in Steubenville, where he announced the indictments earlier this week.

Comment

Thanksgiving and Hanukkah Overlap, Tastily

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

We're all looking forward to firing up the oven tomorrow and for those preparing a Thanksgiving feast in a Jewish household, this is the year to get creative in the kitchen. Thanksgiving and Hanukkah coincide this year, so it's time to explore where those two culinary worlds meet. Deb Perelman, food blogger and author of The Smitten Kitchen Cookbook, joins the Takeaway to discuss so-called 'Thanksgivukkah' recipes.

Comments [2]

Examining Our Changing American Families

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

What does your family look like? The quintessential American family has been changing dramatically in recent years. This week, we're talking about those changes and how they will be reflected at your Thanksgiving table. We're asking about your families as our partner The New York Times takes up the question. Natalie Angier is the reporter behind this effort. Andrew Solomon, author of “Far from the Tree,” writes about all kinds of different families and different kinds of love—notably his own composite clan. 

Comments [9]

The 'Paradox' of American Healthcare: Spending More for Less

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

While Americans have long known that we spend more on healthcare than any other country, most of us aren't reaping the benefits. Compared to most other developed nations, the U.S. falls short on measures of life expectancy. Elizabeth Bradley, a professor of public health at Yale University, and Lauren Taylor, a presidential scholar at Harvard Divinity School, are the co-authors of "The American Health Care Paradox." They argue that the problem may lie in the way Americans think about health care.

Comments [4]

FDA Challenge Raises Questions on Right to Genetic Information

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The genetic-analysis company 23andMe has garnered a devoted following since its launch in 2006. Now the Food and Drug Administration has ordered the company to halt sales of its signature product, the Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service. Nita Farahany, professor of law, genomics and policy at Duke University, took the 23andMe test. She argues that the FDA is overreaching in their regulation of the company.

Comments [3]

FCC May Lift Cell Phone Airplane Ban

Monday, November 25, 2013

The Federal Communications Commission is poised to make a decision on whether to lift the ban on cell phones in flight. Now the cell phone proposition has flight crews up in arms—and passengers aren't so sure how they feel about it, either. Barbara Peterson, senior aviation correspondent for Condé Nast Traveler, looks at the changes ahead, and what we can expect as the holiday travel season kicks off.

Comments [2]

Law, Regulation & Medicine: A Tricky Balancing Act

Friday, November 22, 2013

Perhaps no other field represents the tricky balance between public protection and private life than medicine. Questions of when the legislature should intervene to protect the public, and when decisions are best left to the doctor and her patient, have been politically fraught territory for decades. Jessie Hill, a professor of law at Case Western Reserve University, is an expert on the law, regulation, medicine, and the difficult decisions in between.

Comments [1]