Jillian Weinberger

Jillian Weinberger appears in the following:

FDA Challenge Raises Questions on Right to Genetic Information

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The genetic-analysis company 23andMe has garnered a devoted following since its launch in 2006. Now the Food and Drug Administration has ordered the company to halt sales of its signature product, the Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service. Nita Farahany, professor of law, genomics and policy at Duke University, took the 23andMe test. She argues that the FDA is overreaching in their regulation of the company.

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The 'Paradox' of American Healthcare: Spending More for Less

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

While Americans have long known that we spend more on healthcare than any other country, most of us aren't reaping the benefits. Compared to most other developed nations, the U.S. falls short on measures of life expectancy. Elizabeth Bradley, a professor of public health at Yale University, and Lauren Taylor, a presidential scholar at Harvard Divinity School, are the co-authors of "The American Health Care Paradox." They argue that the problem may lie in the way Americans think about health care.

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FCC May Lift Cell Phone Airplane Ban

Monday, November 25, 2013

The Federal Communications Commission is poised to make a decision on whether to lift the ban on cell phones in flight. Now the cell phone proposition has flight crews up in arms—and passengers aren't so sure how they feel about it, either. Barbara Peterson, senior aviation correspondent for Condé Nast Traveler, looks at the changes ahead, and what we can expect as the holiday travel season kicks off.

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Law, Regulation & Medicine: A Tricky Balancing Act

Friday, November 22, 2013

Perhaps no other field represents the tricky balance between public protection and private life than medicine. Questions of when the legislature should intervene to protect the public, and when decisions are best left to the doctor and her patient, have been politically fraught territory for decades. Jessie Hill, a professor of law at Case Western Reserve University, is an expert on the law, regulation, medicine, and the difficult decisions in between.

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Climate Change Talks Reignite Cold War-Era Conflicts

Thursday, November 21, 2013

United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Warsaw have reopened old wounds this week. Representatives from some of the world's poorest countries staged a walk-out yesterday as the United States, the European Union, Australia and other developed nations refused to discuss payment for extreme environmental damage until after 2015. Isaac Valero, the European Union's spokesman for Climate Action, explains where the E.U. stands and what's in store going forward.

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New Program Arms Immigrants Facing Deportation with Legal Aid

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Immigrants facing detention or deportation have no right to a court-appointed attorney. The New York Immigrant Family Unity Project aims to change that. The Project—the first of its kind in the country—provides indigent immigrants representation in detention and deportation proceedings, regardless of whether they can pay. The Project is the result of a task force of attorneys, activists and experts, chaired by Judge Robert Katzman, chief judge of the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals. 

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Putting Together the Puzzle Pieces of JFK's Legacy

Monday, November 11, 2013

On November 22, the nation will pause to reflect on the 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. As historian Robert Caro says in "American Experience: JFK," a new documentary by Takeaway partner WGBH, "We will never know whether he would have been a great president—I'd bet on him, but we didn't have that chance." In the wake of Kennedy's untimely death, we are left with puzzle pieces that do not make a complete picture of a presidency.

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On Veterans Day, Advice for Veterans From Veterans

Monday, November 11, 2013

Veterans face a myriad of challenges when they return from service, and no one better understands these barriers—and how to overcome them—than veterans themselves. Jason Wasieleski, a former Army medic who served in Afghanistan in 2012, and David Retske, a former UAV pilot who served in Iraq from 2004 to 2005, share their advice for returning veterans and discuss what they wish they had known when they returned from service.

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One Woman's Quest to Recover Her Family's Artwork Stolen by the Nazis

Friday, November 08, 2013

A close friend of Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso, art dealer Paul Rosenberg once dominated Paris's art scene. Nazi forces confiscated much of Rosenberg's collection, at least 400 artworks worth millions of dollars. Marianne Rosenberg, Paul's granddaughter and Alexandre's son, continues her family's quest to recover their stolen art. This week, Marianne confirmed that one of her family's Matisse paintings was in the trove of Nazi-confiscated art recently discovered in Munich. 

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For Veterans Day, Advice for Veterans from Veterans

Thursday, November 07, 2013

This Veterans Day, we're teaming up with the Center for Investigative Reporting to hear from veterans about how they've tackled the obstacles of coming home. We want to know: What advice do you have for veterans who have recently returned? What advice do you wish you’d been given after your service? We also want to hear from veterans who have recently returned: What questions do you have? What advice are you seeking?

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Detroit's New Mayor Inherits Host of Problems

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

With its list of lengthy problems, people are wondering: Who would want to be the mayor of Detroit? The city's dwindling population elected Mike Duggan, a former hospital executive known for rehabilitating troubled institutions. Quinn Klinefelter, reporter for WDET in Detroit, discusses his city's new mayor, and the long list of problems the city's new leader will inherit.

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Church, State & the Supreme Court

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

The small town of GreeceNew York is thrust into the national spotlight this week as the Supreme Court hears arguments on whether the town’s council can open its meetings with Christian prayers. Sarah Barringer Gordon, professor of law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the Greece case and the historical role of religion in public life.

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The Woman Without A Memory, And What She Says About All of Us

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Lonni Sue Johnson suffers from what's called profound amnesia. She can't form new memories or bring up old memories. But while her brain doesn't work the way it should, it does give us profound clues about how our brains work and can be improved. Michael Lemonick is a contributor to Time Magazine, where his piece about Johnson "The Muse of Memory" is published this week.

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Virginia Governor's Race: A GOP Referendum?

Tuesday, November 05, 2013

Once a Republican stronghold, the state of Virginia might be straying from its roots. Thanks to rapidly changing demographics and a strident GOP candidate, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe leads Republican Ken Cuccinelli by seven points. Daniel Palazzolo, professor of political science at the University of Richmond, examines what the implications could be if McAuliffe wins.

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ENDA and the State of the GOP

Monday, November 04, 2013

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid plans to bring the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) to a vote tonight. ENDA would ban workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, and while the bill has little support in the House, advocates are hopeful about its prospects in the Senate, as it's already gained support from several Republican Senators. Sarah Longwell, the treasurer for the Log Cabin Republicans, discusses the GOP interest in ENDA and examines what these crossover votes say about the future of the Republican Party.

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The Significance of Mehsud's Death

Monday, November 04, 2013

On Friday, US fired missiles killed Hakimullah Mehsud, the leader of the Pakistani Taliban, in what may be a huge development in the war against the Taliban in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Madiha Tahir is a documentary filmmaker whose film, "Wounds of Waziristan," looks at the impact of drone strikes close to the Afghanistan border. She discusses the significance of Mehsud's death.

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Courts and the Constitution: Stop-and-Frisk and Abortion Restrictions

Friday, November 01, 2013

Yesterday brought two major legal decisions with big implications in two states. In Texas, a Federal Appeals Court reversed a ruling by a federal judge made just three days prior that would block key components of the state's new restrictive abortion law In New York City, a Federal Appeals Court halted a major decision from August that had deemed stop-and-frisk practices by New York City Police unconstitutional and in violation in the 4th and 14th Amendments. Jeffrey Toobin, legal analyst for The New Yorker, discusses these rulings.

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From the Institution to the Community, JFK's Mental Health Legacy

Friday, November 01, 2013

Americans suffering from mental illness have long faced barriers to treatment, including stigma from their friends, family and peers.
Fifty years ago, President John F. Kennedy sought to change all of that. On October 31, 1963, he signed his last piece of legislation, the Community Mental Health Act, a law that aimed to transform the way mental illness is treated in this country. According to Dr. Paul Appelbaum, a practicing psychiatrist and professor of law, medicine and psychiatry at Columbia University, fifty years later, the Act has a mixed legacy. 

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HUD Secretary Donovan Reflects On Sandy's First Anniversary

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

One year ago this week, Sandy devastated the Eastern Seaboard, leaving at least 117 dead, thousands homeless and an estimated $65 billion in damage. President Barack Obama appointed Shaun Donovan, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, to lead the federal response to Sandy. Secretary Donovan examines Sandy's impact, and discusses the state of the recovery effort one year later. 

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Science Friday's Ira Flatow on Extreme Weather One Year After Sandy

Tuesday, October 29, 2013

While the science behind climate change may still be controversial in some circles, it's come increasingly difficult to deny that the planet is growing warmer. And though scientists are cautious when it comes to cause and effect, most experts agree there is a link between climate change and storms like Hurricane Sandy. Science Friday's Ira Flatow examines the lessons learned, and the link between climate change and extreme weather. 

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