Hsi-Chang Lin

Associate Producer

Hsi-Chang Lin appears in the following:

Iraq and Afghanistan Wars Back in News at Panetta Confirmation Hearing

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Since the shooting death of Osama bin Laden, the news has been dominated by stories of the former al-Qaida leader; but, the country’s foreign policy priorities do not end with the discover of his Abbottabad compound. By the time that Leon Panetta takes the stand for his Senate confirmation hearing, politicians on the Left and the Right will be clamoring for their chance have their foreign policy issues back in the limelight. To preview some of the issues we that will make their way back into the news we speak with David Sanger, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times.

Comment

FEMA Wants $22 Million in Aid Back

Thursday, May 12, 2011

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, better known as FEMA, is asking thousands of Americans to return more than $22 million in government aid. The agency claims that it doled that money erroneously, to disaster victims ineligible for the support. In some cases, individual claimants will be asked to return up to $27,000.

Comment

Man vs. Nature Along the Mississippi Delta

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Water is driven to find the shortest and quickest course from source to mouth and the Mississippi River is no exception. The river is fighting against modern engineering as it continues to crest. If it were allowed to flow freely, New Orlean's Atchafalaya River would capture the main flow of the Mississippi. However, thanks to a feat of modern engineering, the great river is forced to follow its current path through Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Some researchers believe the likelihood of major flooding increases each year due to this tension between water and engineering.

Comment

Life With Osama Bin Laden

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Over a week after the shooting death of Osama bin Laden, Pakistan announced that it has yet to receive a formal request from the United States for access to his three widows left behind in the Abbottabad compound. The C.I.A. believes the three widows harbor valuable information about the terrorist leader. However, it is very possible that the wives were so sheltered that they don't have any information. For insight into life with the world's most renowned terrorist mastermind, we speak with Jean Sasson, author of "Growing Up Bin Laden: Osama's Wife and Son Take Us Inside their Secret World," a memoir of Osama bin Laden’s son Omar and first wife Najwa bin Laden.

Comments [1]

Mississippi River Crests Near Record Levels

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

The Mississippi River reached near record levels on Monday when it crested at 48 feet around 7 p.m. Experts, who have been watching as heavy rains swell the waterway's thousands of tributaries and feeder streams, expect the level to remain high for at least the next 48 hours. Memphis residents began to evacuate their homes over the weekend, for fear that the flood waters could rise high enough to become a serious threat. This flooding might prove more devastating than the 1927 floods, which killed hundreds and flooded tens of thousands of farmland acreage.

Comments [5]

Did US Overstep Legal Bounds in Bin Laden Mission?

Friday, May 06, 2011

On Thursday, the head of Pakistan’s army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani said that he would not tolerate future covert missions by the United States within his borders. Does that mean that the U.S. has overstretched its reach in the war against al-Qaida? That's the question international law experts have been addressing since Monday's covert operation, which ended with the death of former al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden.

Comments [1]

Naming Osama Bin Laden's Successor

Thursday, May 05, 2011

Speculation continues regarding the future of al-Qaida’s leadership following the killing of its leader Osama bin Laden. There are rules governing who is next in line, explains Leah Farrall. Farrall is the former Senior Counter-Terrorism Analyst for the Australian Federal Police and currently the author of the blog, All Things Counter-Terrorism. In a recent article for Foreign Policy magazine, she writes that "like any good corporation, the terror network has a strict series of rules and regulations it must adhere to in naming a successor. Rules that provide insight into how any future power struggles may play out." And these rules point to number two leader Ayman al-Zawahiri.

Comments [1]

White House to Withhold Osama bin Laden Photos

Thursday, May 05, 2011

The White House has announced that it will not release photos of Osama bin Laden’s death. Quoting the transcript of President Obama’s upcoming interview with 60 Minutes, set to air this Sunday, White House Spokesperson Jay Carney told reporters that, “It is important for us to make sure that very graphic photos of somebody who was shot in the head are not floating around as an incitement to further violence or as a propaganda tool.” Some very graphic photos from the raid have already been published by The Guardian. Is the release of graphic photos a good idea? 

Comments [8]

Osama Bin Laden and the Burden of Proof

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Sunday’s mission to infiltrate and extract Osama bin Laden was by all measures a success. But in the nearly decade-long process that led up to this moment, there's a new debate raging over how intelligence officials went about finding the world's most hunted terrorist. The latest reporting by journalists suggest detainees at Guantanamo Bay and in secret prisons in Europe were interrogated to obtain any information about bin Laden's whereabouts — including the identity of his courier.

Comments [3]

Former Navy SEAL Team Six Sniper on Bin Laden Mission

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

In his new memoir, former Navy SEAL sniper Howard Wasdin writes, “When the U.S. Navy sends their elite, they send the SEALs. When the SEALs send their elite, they send SEAL Team Six.” And that was certainly the case on Sunday, when a team of highly trained men overtook a a secure compound in Pakistan to eliminate the world’s most wanted terrorist figure. They accomplished this mission, in the midst of crossfire, in under 40 minutes. We talk with Howard Wasdin, a former member of this clandestine unit, about what Team Six must have gone through to get face-to-face with Osama bin Laden.

Comments [1]

The Making of a US Navy SEAL

Tuesday, May 03, 2011

On Sunday, a military operation lasting approximately 40 minutes, transformed an elite fighting force known for keeping a low profile, into the talk of the world. Former US Navy SEAL Michael Howard and Retired US Army Colonel Douglas MacGregor discuss what goes into training one of the most elite fighting force in the world. 

Comments [1]

Deadly Tornados Tear Through South States

Friday, April 29, 2011

This morning, survivors of the six southern states hit by Wednesday’s rash of deadly tornadoes continue the hard work of surveying and cleaning the damage. We speak with Julie Steel, News reporter for WUTC in Chattanooga, Tennessee, a town that was hit repeatedly by waves of storms.

Comment

Tornadoes Rip Through South; Hundreds Dead

Friday, April 29, 2011

Deadly tornadoes that ripped through the South on Wednesday claimed some 284 lives. Entire neighborhoods were flattened in the wake of the 160 tornadoes that touched down in six states. We speak with Campbell Robertson, correspondent for our partner The New York Times, who joins us from Tuscaloosa Alabama, one of the areas hardest hit by the storms.

Comment

Growing Threat: Friendly Fire for Troops in Afghanistan

Thursday, April 28, 2011

For our troops fighting in Afghanistan, there may be a new threat, beyond the constant worry of enemy fire which occurs in the field. This new threat is growing behind friendly lines. According to Stars and Stripes, at least 38 coalition troops have been killed by Afghan Security forces undergoing routine  training. Two weeks ago, 5 NATO troops were killed by a Taliban suicide bomber who enlisted as an Afghan National Army soldier.

Comment

Facing Long Term Unemployment

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

"If we don’t get this unemployment rate down, eventually it’s going to stick," former chairwoman of President Obama's Council of Economic Advisors Christina Romer warned on Monday's show. "We’re going to have discouraged workers, people who have lost many skills. They may have a higher unemployment rate forever after, and that would be a true disaster.”

Comments [2]

Who Determines US Foreign Policy in the Middle East?

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Since January 25, when a wave of popular protests began to sweep across the Middle East region, the U.S. has been put into several very precarious policy positions. The most obvious question is: should the U.S. stand on the side of revolution and support the protesters seeking new Democratic leadership; or, should we continue to support the incumbent, sometimes brutal, autocratic regimes that have been our long-time allies in the region? The answers aren't always clear. 

Comment

Arab Spring and the Obama Doctrine

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

President Barack Obama is a different leader than candidate Barack Obama. What remains difficult to discern is just how different both men are on matters of U.S. foreign policy. Critics to both the left and the right of the president have voiced frustration at the administration's obstinate refusal to state a foreign policy doctrine. Ryan Lizza, Washington correspondent for The New Yorker describes how recent events in the Middle East may be creating an Obama doctrine on its own.

Comment

Japan Auto Industry Hit Hard by Quake

Monday, April 25, 2011

This morning, Honda, Toyota, Suzuki, Mazda, Mitsubishi and Nissan release their domestic production levels, sales, and export results for the month of March. This is the first time that the largest Japanese automakers have shown hard numbers of their company’s activity since a deadly earthquake occurred off the coast of Sendai. Ever since the devastating earthquake officials in Japan have been putting on a brave public face. But, that posture may be coming at a high cost.

Comment

Sugar: Delicious and Deadly?

Friday, April 15, 2011

Is sugar toxic? A 90 minute YouTube video of pediatrics professor Robert Lustig trying to answer the question has counted 800,000 hits. The New York Times has an interesting piece in the magazine section that explains why sugar is on the minds of so many Americans. Marion Nestle is a professor of nutrition at New York University and the author of "What to Eat" and Barry Popkin is the distinguished professor of global nutrition at the University of North Carolina school of public health. Together they explain why sugar is a major public health risk, and what we should do to control it.

Comments [4]

Former Senators Weigh in on Government Shutdown Threat

Friday, April 08, 2011

How does the looming shutdown compare to the 1995 government shutdown? Byron Dorgan, former Democratic senator from the state of North Dakota and Bob Bennett, former Republican Senator from the state of Utah held their senate seats during the last government shutdown back in 1995. However,  this time they are watching the situation unfold with the rest of America. Both men share their frustrations with, and their concerns for, the nation's representatives.

Comment