Hsi-Chang Lin

Associate Producer

Hsi-Chang Lin appears in the following:

What Does It Take for a Dictator to Surrender?

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Rebels in Libya continue to struggle with each other over who will control the country, and with Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists, who rejected their offer for the missing leader to surrender. Meanwhile, nearly two weeks over rebels took over Tripoli, Gadhafi remains separated from his wife and two children, who fled to Algeria earlier this week. What will it take for Gadhafi to step down?

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August Was Bloodiest Month for Afghanistan War

Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Sixty-six troops died in Afghanistan this month, making August the bloodiest month for the U.S. military this year. That number includes the helicopter crash on August 6, which claimed the lives of 30 American troops, most of them Navy SEALs. So far this year, 299 Americans have been killed in Afghanistan. Will this have any affect on President Obama's plans to drawdown the additional 33,000 troops he placed in a surge effort? 

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Why Hurricane Irene Did (or Did Not) Prove Forecasters Wrong

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

In preparing for Hurricane Irene’s weekend arrival, communities along the East Coast prepared for the worst. New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg insisted on Friday that New Yorkers "must, I repeat the word 'must,' evacuate beginning tomorrow and complete the process by 8pm tomorrow night." But his historic preparations turned out to be for a less-than-historic storm, at least in New York City. While all Americans are glad that the loss of life, property and infrastructure was relatively minimal, many people are now wondering: why was Irene so much less the threat we were told it would be?

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Vermont Struggles With Recovery After Irene

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Upstate New York and parts of Vermont were struck by rapid flooding brought on by Tropical Storm Irene over the weekend. Due to wind damage and fallen trees, downed power lines remain a problem, as do hundreds of flooded roads. In Vermont, there have already been three confirmed fatalities due to the storm — two were swept into rushing waters and drowned. Fifty-thousand homes and businesses remain without power in what officials are calling Vermont's worst natural disaster since flooding in 1927. A majority of homeowners in Vermont who were affected by the storm lack insurance that covers flood damage.

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Inside the Mind of Moammar Gadhafi

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Over the course of his 42-year reign, Libyan ruler Moammar Gadhafi has garnered a reputation for being one of the most eccentric and unpredictable leaders on the global stage. Since assuming leadership of the country at age 27, his rule felt unshakable until the first series of uprisings in February. What makes him tick, and what could he be thinking now, as he continues to hide from rebel forces while his leadership seems to be reaching an end?

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Lessons for Libya from Kosovo

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Yesterday, we discussed the differences in battle techniques between the NATO-backed uprisings in Libya, and recent U.S. military efforts in the Middle East. Our guest, Gideon Rose, editor for Foreign Affairs magazine and the author of "How Wars End: Why We Always Fight the Last Battle," said that comparisons can be drawn between NATO's efforts in Kosovo, and what has transpired this year in Libya. We decided to look into this further.

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Where is Moammar Gadhafi, And Who Is Searching For Him?

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The world was watching Libya yesterday, after rebel forces entered and took control of the capital city of Tripoli Sunday night, attempting to oust Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who is still at large. The streets of Tripoli today were a mix of celebrations and gunfire, as rebels and Gadhafi loyalists faced off. CNN reporter Matthew Chance said last night that he saw Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, at the Rixos hotel in Tripoli. Seif al-Islam said that all of his family, including his father, was in Tripoli, and that the rebel's claims of capturing them were false.

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The Next Step for Libyan Democracy

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

The world has been watching Libya, after rebel forces entered and took control of the capital city of Tripoli Sunday night, attempting to oust Col. Moammar Gadhafi, who is still at large. The streets of Tripoli yesterday were a mix of celebrations and gunfire, as rebels and Gadhafi loyalists faced off. CNN reporter Matthew Chance said last night that he saw Gadhafi's son, Seif al-Islam, at the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli. Seif al-Islam said that all of his family, including his father, was in Tripoli, and that the rebel's claims of capturing them were false. 

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Can Rebels Boost Oil Production?

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Before the uprisings began in Libya in February, the nation produced 1.6 million barrels of oil per day, and was responsible for two percent of the world's oil supplies. Six months ago, shipments stopped at the rebellion grew there. The loss of Libyan oil drove up the price of Brent crude, which is sold to refineries on the United States' east coast.

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Paris to Host Ninth Annual Homeless World Cup

Friday, August 19, 2011

On Sunday homeless men and women from across the globe will meet in Paris, France to compete in the ninth Homeless World Cup. The decade-old event is an international four-on-four soccer tournament that brings together homeless athletes, and also draws attention to the plight of the 100 million homeless people around the world. Games are spectator-friendly, and will take place in the city's center.

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How History May Judge Obama in Crisis

Friday, August 19, 2011

Winston Churchill will always be remembered for his handling of the Axis powers in World War II; President George W. Bush and Rudy Giuliani are inextricably linked to their responses to 9/11. Many world leaders are known best for actions they took in times of great crises. For our nation's current leader, the history books are still being written, and a second presidential term is a possibility. We wanted to preview what history may say of President Obama’s handling of the social, economic and military crises that have so far marked his first term in office. How will future generations remember him?

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'Senna' Documents the Life of a Formula One Legend

Friday, August 19, 2011

Formula One racing attracts fans all over the world, and back in the '80s and '90s there was one man who everybody wanted to see race: Brazilian driver Ayrton Senna. Known for being a charismatic risk taker on and off the track, Senna's legions of fans were shocked when he was killed in a crash during the San Marino Grand Prix in 1994. A new documentary called "Senna" tells the story of his life. The film won the World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary at this year's Sundance Festival.

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Artists and Labels May Soon Battle Over Song Rights

Thursday, August 18, 2011

One-hit wonders often spell long term rewards for record companies, which can make millions of dollars from legacy recordings — as long as they own the rights. That may be about to change. A provision in U.S. copyright law stipulates that songs released after 1978 have "termination rights," which offer artists the ability to regain ownership of their work after 35 years have passed. With that deadline on the horizon, a battle is looming between artists and labels over song rights. 

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'Super Committee' Considers Military Budget Cuts

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Tasked with fixing the nation’s economic problems, the bipartisan "super committee" of twelve Congressional members may be leading some politically sacred cows to slaughter. In the halls of Congress, there is now discussion of making cuts in defense, intelligence and military spending, including pensions for retirees with 20 years of military service. Is Congress really ready to change the course of our military spending, or, is this just another bargaining tactic?

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Big Ideas to Fix the Economy: Cap CEO Pay

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

This week we’ve been asking listeners to suggest ideas on how to fix the economy. So far we’ve talked about raising inflation and boosting housing prices. Today we're talking about capping the total compensation that CEOs earn — including salary, benefits and bonuses — at $5 million. Any additional money would go back to the company, hopefully creating more jobs. Who would step up to do this? Perhaps Warren Buffett, in light of his recent op-ed for The New York Times.

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How To Stop Gang Violence: Lessons From Chicago for the UK

Friday, August 12, 2011

How should the United Kingdom combat the violence that's raged across the country all week? British Prime Minister David Cameron says the country needs to learn a few lessons from America on how to fight gangs, along with possibly revoking social media and Blackberry service from rioters. What can the U.S. offer as advice for the U.K. on handling gang violence?

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UK's Youth Planning to be 'Poorer Than Their Parents'

Thursday, August 11, 2011

As riots and unrest continue to spread throughout England, some say they began with youths who are unhappy with the economic climate there. Throughout the U.K., there is a growing sense that many young people are going to face more difficult financial times than their parents' generation did. The future will bring fewer job opportunities and lower pensions, which will mature at a later date and come at a greater personal cost. Overall, there’s a feeling that politicians are inept to fix the nation’s economic problems.

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As Markets Rise and Fall, Which Numbers Count?

Thursday, August 11, 2011

It's been a week of ups and downs for the U.S. markets, which ended at 600 points down on Monday, rose Tuesday, and took another nose dive yesterday. But those numbers only tell half of the story. All week long, experts like our economics editor, Charlie Herman, have reminded our listeners that a cursory glance at the markets is not a direct indicator of our economic well-being. If we shouldn't be worrying about the perpetual stock market roller coaster, which numbers should we be watching instead?

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China and the US: An Economic Turning Point?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Yesterday, U.S. Treasury secretary Timothy Geithner spoke by phone with his Chinese counterpart, Vice Premier Wang Qishan, to discuss the challenges facing global markets after a tumultuous week for the U.S. economy. China's stock market plunged on Monday (along with the U.S.'s), following the news that Standard and Poor downgraded America's credit rating. Chinese investors are concerned that the current poor economic climate in the U.S. will lead to decreased demand for Chinese exports. China is the largest U.S. foreign creditor, but over the weekend on Chinese websites many people were calling for China to invest less money in the U.S.

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Oscar Pistorious: The Six Million Dollar Man?

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

After years of training, double-amputee Oscar Pistorious achieved his dream this week, when South Africa's athletics federation selected him for the country's team in the track and field world championships. Pistorious — who was born without fibulae, or calf bone — achieved an Olympic qualifying time of 45.07 seconds for the 400-meter dash last month. But not everybody is rooting for him to succeed. Some critics are saying that Pistorious's prosthetic legs have unfairly boosted his performance in time trials.

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