Hsi-Chang Lin

Associate Producer

Hsi-Chang Lin appears in the following:

One Month Anniversary of Trayvon Martin's Death Marked by Protests and New Facts in the Case

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

Yesterday the case of Trayvon Martin took a number of significant turns — among them, a report that Martin knocked George Zimmerman to the ground and beat him before Zimmerman fired. Today, we review the new developments and speak with Michael Bender, a reporter for Bloomberg News.

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President Embraces "ObamaCare"

Tuesday, March 27, 2012

In this conversation with Kathleen Hall Jamieson, professor of communications and director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania, we hear how Democrats plan to rehabilitate the word "ObamaCare" through coordinated public relations campaigns online and off.  

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Santorum Focuses on Pennsylvania After Romney Takes Illinois Delegates

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

The day after Mitt Romney took 54 delegates in Illinois, Rick Santorum has set his sights on Pennsylvania, where he served two terms as Senator. His speech last night from Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, sought to define himself as the anti-businessman and the anti-Romney. But even if Santorum wins Pennsylvania on April 24th, would it be enough to win the delegate war?

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Albert Einstein's Documents Going Online

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Albert Einstein's entire archive of manuscripts, letters, theoretical musings, and personal correspondences are going online. More than 80,000 pages of material, owned by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will now be digitized and shared on the web. To date, only 900 pages of the brilliant scientist's legacy have ever been available to the public. The digital archive will offer the world an entirely new look at one of the 20th century's most important figures, scientific or otherwise. 

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Will Parent Trigger Laws Improve Schools?

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

In some states, parents frustrated with the public school system may have a new tool to fix their child’s education. Parent trigger laws, passed in some form in four states already, give dissatisfied parents the power to fire teachers, convert a public school to a charter, or even shut down the school altogether. As one can imagine, such a dramatic solution to the problem of public education has created quite a controversy. Parents and educators alike are asking: should parents have their fingers on the trigger of public education?

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Are Hate Crime Laws Necessary?

Monday, March 19, 2012

As the webcam-spying trial of Rutgers student Dharun Ravi comes to an end, some people have questioned whether hate crime laws are necessary at all. On the one hand, they dole out harsher punishments for crimes motivated by discrimination and bigotry. On the other, is the same crime worse depending on the identity of the victim? In the Rutgers case, the jury must decide if Ravi's actions constituted a hate crime or just a tasteless prank.

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Homeschooling on the Rise Among African-Americans

Monday, March 19, 2012

According to the National Home Education Research Institute (NHEI), about two million American children (about 4 percent of all American students) receive their education at home. The NHEI claims that those families are usually white Christians in rural areas who disagree with the public school system on religious grounds. 

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Friday Follow: Santorum Takes Primaries, HBO Show Runs out of Luck, March Madness Sweeps the Country

Friday, March 16, 2012

Every Friday, The Takeaway convenes a panel to look back at the week's big stories. This week Rick Santorum wins Alabama and Mississippi, March Madness sweeps the country, and liquid detergent becomes a black market commodity.

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New Details About the Psychological State of Alleged Shooter in Afghanistan

Friday, March 16, 2012

Comments by the lawyer for the U.S. soldier who allegedly killed 16 Afghan civilians on Sunday has shed new light on the psychological state of the soldier in question. The lawyer, John Henry Browne, says the soldier was reluctant about going on another tour of duty, and was having tensions with his wife about the deployments on the night of the shooting. In addition, a senior U.S. official tells our partner The New York Times that the soldier had been drinking alcohol, a violation of military rules in combat zones. "When it all comes out, it will be a combination of stress, alcohol and domestic issues — he just snapped," the unnamed senior official said.

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Goldman Sachs Employee's Public Letter of Resignation

Thursday, March 15, 2012

When Goldman Sachs employee Greg Smith handed in his letter of resignation, he did so in the most public manner possible — by posting it in the pages of The New York Times. In his letter, the former derivatives trader described the firm's working environment as "toxic and destructive" and accused their culture of placing company profits over client interest whenever possible.

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Human Rights Abuses Across Syrian Borders

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

According to new reports from Human Rights Watch, Syria is laying landmines across its borders with Lebanon and Turkey. Steve Goose, arms division director for Human Rights Watch, called the use of these weapons "unconscionable," going on to say that "there is absolutely no justification for the use of these indiscriminate weapons by any country, anywhere, for any purpose." What implications will these weapons have on the estimated 200,000 refugees still within Syrian borders?

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GOP Candidates Recalibrate Strategies After Primaries in Alabama and Mississippi

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Rick Santorum won both GOP primaries in the South yesterday. He took 35 percent of the vote in Alabama and 33 percent in Mississippi. Do these results spell the end of the road for Newt Gingrich? And what does this mean for Tuesday's third-place winner, delegate leader Mitt Romney?

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Primary Election Wrap-up: What's Next for the GOP after Alabama and Mississippi?

Wednesday, March 14, 2012

More than halfway through the Republican primaries, there is still no clear frontrunner. It's a three-way race with four men running, and the guy that no one paid any attention to last year keeps walking away with primary victories. Our expert political panel examines last night’s Republican primary election results and discuss what Mississippi and Alabama's wins may mean for the GOP race ahead. 

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2012 Primary: A Less Predictable Deep South

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

For Republican presidential candidates, capturing the Deep South means capturing the base of American conservatism. But southern voters have yet to decide on any one candidate, and southern sensibilities are broadening. Our partner, the New York Times, reported that the southern conservative electorate may be far more diverse than it once was. Are the Southern Republican voters going to gravitate towards Rick Santorum’s conservative social agenda, or are voters more about Newt Gingrich, the only one on the ballots with actual ties to the south? And what about Mitt Romney — are Southern evangelicals ready for a Mormon president?  

Rethinking Afghanistan After Civilian Killings

Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Information continues to trickle out about the American Army Staff Sergeant who allegedly killed 16 Afghan civilians over the weekend. Who is he?  What were his motives? For some, the killings have prompted very different questions about the longest war in American history. Perhaps most importantly, how much longer should America be engaged in the region at all?

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Does the South Still Influence the GOP?

Friday, March 09, 2012

The South has played a crucial role to the Republican Party for decades. Since 1996 every Republican presidential nominee has had some personal connection to the South. Furthermore, each of those nominees achieved their position by aggressively courting the Southern vote by reflecting their ethics and policy positions. Not so with Mitt Romney. Does that reflect more on the former Massachusetts governor's strategy, or a realization that the south may be experiencing a waning influence over the GOP?

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Cincinnati Engineer Sued for Tweet: Do You Fact Check your Tweets?

Thursday, March 08, 2012

It was a case of crime and punishment in the digital age when Cincinnati-based mechanical engineer Mark Miller took to Twitter with a series of politically heated missives about a local municipal project. Upset that the city of Cincinnati, Ohio would be spending money on a new streetcar, Miller sent tweet after tweet about how those efforts were browning out large percentages of fire departments in the city limits. Miller's tweets didn't just incite local debate, they got Miller slapped with a lawsuit, because under an Ohio law, it's illegal to make false statements in political campaigns. There are 17 states with similar laws -- but do those laws still reflect the reality we are living in?

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Does the GOP Need to Fix its Primary System?

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Here's a question you may not have asked yourself: why does the Republican party hold primaries and caucuses at all? Is there a better system than the long, drawn out process of staggered elections which push and pull the political momentum towards different candidates at different points in the cycle? Wouldn't it be easier to have all of the states elect their nominee at once? Or is there another way entirely to choose our political leaders? 

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Super Tuesday Exit Polls Hold Clues for General Election

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Super Tuesday results aren't just about state-by-state winners and losers -- or about securing delegates. They're also a crucial barometer of what matters to voters and why. Detailed exit polls results from contests around the country paint a complex picture about what issues voters of different demographics are most passionate about and who they believe will be represent their interests.  

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Does the GOP Alienate Women Voters?

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

In recent weeks, the Republican party has had a difficult time charming a key slice of its political base: women.
For his part … Rick Santorum has been advocating against women’s access to contraception.  And even more recently… conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh is facing heat for the inflammatory and misogynistic comments made on his show.  
It should be noted that both Romney and Santorum have distanced themselves from Limbaugh’s comments. 
My next guest says that these isolated incidents speak to a bigger problem among the Republican party as a whole; specifically, that the grand old party has been ignoring, marginalizing or just offending women for years.  And that polls show this is going to hurt the party in the short term and the long. 
We’re joined now by Jennifer DeJournett [deh-JOOR-nett], president and co-founder of VOICES of Conservative Women, a non-profit that works to get women engaged in the political process.
In recent weeks, the Republican party has had a difficult time charming a key slice of its political base: women. Rick Santorum has been advocating against women’s access to contraception. Although both Romney and Santorum have distanced themselves from Rush Limbaugh's comments, the conservative radio host is facing heat for the inflammatory and misogynistic comments made on his show.

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