Farai Chideya

Political Contributor

Farai Chideya appears in the following:

The New Liberal on the Court

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

As President Obama puts his mark on the Supreme Court, Republicans are cautioning against a return to a liberal court. But New York Times Magazine contributor – and law professor – Jeffrey Rosen says Obama is redefining the ideological debate.

For more, read Jeffrey Rosen's story in the New York Times Magazine, What’s a Liberal Justice Now?. Also read Rosen's article in The New Republic, The Case Against Sotomayor.

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Singing the Blues: The Legendary Henry Butler on Art and Ability

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

The Takeaway talks with legendary bluesman Henry Butler. Butler has been blind since birth but that hasn't stopped him from playing to packed houses or from taking up a new craft: photography. Also joining the conversation on art and ability is Charlie Washburn, the Executive Director of VSA Arts of Massachusetts, an organization dedicated to including everyone in the arts.

Watch Henry Butler perform "High Heeled Sneakers" in the video below.

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Violence in Pakistan

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

A huge explosion outside a police building in the Pakistani city of Lahore has killed at least 23 people and injured about 250. Officials said gunmen opened fire from a car which drove up to the building, near the provincial headquarters of Pakistan's main intelligence agency, the ISI. After police returned fire, the car exploded, damaging buildings over a wide radius. Rescue workers are digging through the rubble for survivors. While no one has claimed responsibility for the attack, Taliban militants have threatened retaliation for the government's current offensive in the northwest of the country. For more, we turn to Rob Watson, defense correspondent for the BBC World Service, who is following the story.

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Parenting Choices: What Constitutes Neglect?

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Two stories in different parts of the country have re-ignited the issue of when the state should step in and take over for parents. Yesterday a Minnesota judge ruled that the parents of thirteen-year old Daniel Hauser can regain custody of their son as long as he gets the cancer treatment that he needs. The Hausers lost custody of Daniel when his mother took him off of his chemotherapy treatments and then fled to California to escape a court order to resume the treatment. And last week the state of South Carolina set out to determine whether a child's morbid obesity is enough to charge the parents with neglect. The Takeaway talks to Kate Dailey, who writes for the Human Condition blog for Newsweek magazine about where we draw the line on negligence. To watch an interview with the Hausers, click here.
"They're really just looking at: Is the kid getting the treatment they need to live? And if not, that's neglect."
—Kate Dailey of Newsweek on state intervention in parenting

After Kate left the studio, she found she had more to say. For her additional thoughts, click here.

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Surprises on the Supreme Court

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

President Obama nominated Judge Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday. His pick is a New York Puerto Rican who is generally considered left-leaning. But once a judge is actually on the court, there's no way of knowing how they will rule. FDR hated Felix Frankfurter's love of judicial restraint. And David Souter, whose seat Sonia Sotomayor is nominated to fill, surprised George H.W. Bush, the president who nominated him, by becoming one of the more liberal justices. Joining us to discuss how Supreme Court justices develop their view is Harvard Law professor Noah Feldman, who once clerked for Justice Souter, and John Schwartz, the legal correspondent for The New York Times.

In case you missed it, here's President Obama officially nominating Judge Sotomayor:

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After Prop 8: The Future of Gay Marriage in California

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Advocates for gay marriage in California hoped the State Supreme Court would overturn last November’s ballot initiative that took away the right to same-sex marriage, but their hopes were dashed yesterday when the court upheld Proposition 8, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman. The Takeaway is joined by John Schwartz, the legal correspondent for The New York Times to discuss the repercussions of this ruling.
"People have a deep emotional tie over generations to the word 'marriage.' People who want to protect marriage feel intensely strongly about it. People who want to get married want to get married."
—New York Times writer John Schwartz on Proposition 8 in California

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The Jurisprudence of Judge Sotomayor

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

President Obama is about to announce his Supreme Court pick: Sonia Sotomayor, the first American of Puerto Rican descent to be appointed to the Federal bench in New York City, now in the Appeals Court of the 2nd Circuit. Judge Sotomayor earned a reputation as a sharp, outspoken and fearless jurist, someone who does not let powerful interests bully, rush or cow her into a decision. For more about the potential Justice we turn to Jenny Rivera, who clerked for Judge Sotomayor in the Southern District of New York Court in 1992 and is now a professor at the City University of New York Law School and the Director of the Center for Latino and Latina Rights and Equality. We are also joined by Slate Magazine's Senior Legal Correspondent Dahlia Lithwick.

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Beyond Yao Ming: China and the NBA

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

In the middle of the Eastern Conference playoffs, the Cleveland Cavaliers are making news, and not just for their three-point shots and MVP LeBron James. Over the weekend, the Cavaliers agreed to sell a 15 percent stake in its franchise to a group of Chinese investors. This is the first major Chinese investment in an American sports team. For more we turn to The Takeaway's sports contributor, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin.

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Sotomayor: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

President Obama will nominate Judge Sonia Sotomayor of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit as his first appointment to the court. New Yorkers have long known this judge who grew up in the Bronx in the shadows of Yankee Stadium. Back in 1995, Judge Sotomayor issued an injunction against major league baseball owners, effectively ending a baseball strike of nearly eight months. For what the rest of the nation needs to know about this likely pick to fill the seat of retiring Justice David Souter, we turn to New York Times reporter Jeff Zeleny.

Here is a clip of Sotomayor speaking at Duke University in 2005, which has stirred some controversy.

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Introducing Judge Sotomayor: Her Life and Her Record

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Several administration officials say President Obama has settled on his pick for the Supreme Court. The name that's being floated is Sonia Sotomayor, who's been a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit since 1998. Joining us to discuss her background and her record as a judge is Adam Liptak, Supreme Court Correspondent for the New York Times.
"There's something wrong with a society that's 50/50 men and women and there's only one woman on the court."
—New York Times correspondent Adam Liptak on the Supreme Court nomination

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Obama's Nominee: The Supremes' First Hispanic Woman

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

President Obama is expected to announce that he will fill retiring Justice David Souter's seat on the high court with Sonia Sotomayor. She would be the first Hispanic member of the Supreme Court. Sotomayor is a self-described "Newyorkican" who grew up in housing projects in the Bronx after her parents moved to New York from Puerto Rico. She attended Princeton University and Yale Law School before becoming a prosecutor and a federal judge. She also has a bipartisan background, having been appointed to the bench by George H.W. Bush and then nominated to the appeals court by Bill Clinton. And did we mention that she helped end the baseball strike? For more about the potential Justice we turn to Slate Magazine's Senior Legal Correspondent Dahlia Lithwick.

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Sonia Sotomayor: Obama's Supreme Court Pick

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Early reports say that President Obama has made his choice for the U.S. Supreme Court. The pick to fill retiring Justice Souter's seat appears to be Sonia Sotomayor. She has been a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit since 1998. Before joining the appeals court, she served as a United States District Court judge for the Southern District of New York. The Takeaway turns to Columbia Law Professor Nate Persily for more.

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Cooking Up A New Theory Of Human Evolution

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

To answer what makes us human has long been a scientific quest. It’s one that Dr. Richard Wrangham has been wrestling with since the 1970’s, when he started his career, observing chimps with Dr. Jane Goodall. Then about 10 years ago, while sitting in front of his own fireplace, a theory of human evolution came to him. It’s one that he lays out in his new book: Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human. Richard Wrangham is the Ruth B. Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. He joins The Takeaway with his take on human evolution.

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The Cost of Health Care: A Doctor's Diagnosis

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

When it comes to health care, do you get what you pay for? Dr. Atul Gawande wanted to examine costs -- and quality. In the latest issue of The New Yorker he compares McAllen, Texas, one of the most expensive health care markets in the country, to the Mayo Clinic, one of the country’s most effective, low-cost health systems. Dr. Gawande is a surgeon and writer; his most recent book is Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance

For more, read Dr. Atul Gawande's article The Cost Conundrum in The New Yorker.

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Nukes, Hawks and Ambassador John Bolton

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Just hours after the U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea's nuclear tests, Pyongyang tested more missiles. President Obama criticized the tests, prompting North Korea to respond that its "army and people are fully ready for battle... against any reckless U.S. attempt for a pre-emptive attack."

An American attack is extremely unlikely. But what clout does the U.S. or the international community have? The Takeaway turns to John Bolton: he served as the Permanent U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations from August 2005 until December 2006 and is currently a Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.
"The next step really ought to be the kind of sweeping economic sanctions that were imposed on Iraq after it invaded Kuwait in 1990. That would be a real sign."
—Former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton on the U.S. response to North Korea

Click through for transcript

In case you missed the President's remarks on North Korea, here they are:

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Get On The Bus, Gus: Bus Rapid Transit Takes Hold

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

With shrinking budgets and expanding populations, cities across the globe are desperate for cheap mass transit. From Johannesburg to Jakarta to Cleveland, city governments are choosing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)— a bus system that acts like a train but with no tracks or rails. The Takeaway talks to freelance reporter Steven Dudley, who explored the successful BRT system in Bogota, Colombia, and to Dan Moulthrop, reporter for WCPN, Cleveland Public Radio, where the city has been making the transition to a Bus Rapid Transit system.

To see the buses in action, watch the film below:

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Google Earthing North Korea

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

North Korea is one of the world's most secretive societies. Curtis Melvin, a PhD student at George Mason University visited the communist nation in 2004 and '05 and was determined to learn even more about the closed kingdom. So he started a hobby, mapping North Korea with the help of Google Earth.

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The Complicated Case of Same Sex Divorce

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

A ruling is expected today from the California Supreme Court that will either uphold Proposition 8, the gay marriage ban, or overturn it as unconstitutional. Whatever the California court decides, gay marriage is now legal in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Iowa, and it will be legal in Vermont and Maine in September. And, inevitably, with marriage comes divorce. As couples and attorneys are learning, same sex divorce is at least as complex and controversial as same sex marriage. Frederick Hertz, an attorney in Oakland California and author of Making it Legal: A Guide to Same-Sex Marriage, Domestic Partnership & Civil Unions joins Farai and John with a look at the issue.

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No Nukes Is Good Nukes: Hans Blix And The IAEA

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

The U.S. and the United Nations now have to calibrate their reaction to North Korea's recent missile test, while also worrying about Iran's nuclear ambition and fears of proliferation on the subcontinent. The International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA, is the international regulatory agency charged with monitoring the use and development of nuclear energy. But the agency is in the middle of electing a new general director. There are five candidates vying for the job and they are officially announcing their candidacies today. How much can the agency do?

Hans Blix knows something about those nuclear politics. He served as Director General of the IAEA from 1981 to 1997 before he was tapped to lead the U.N. committee that was eventually charged with searching for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. He joins The Takeaway to discuss North Korea and the new era of nuclear politics.

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What Memorial Day Was Meant to Be

Monday, May 25, 2009

Memorial Day is typically considered the unofficial beginning of summer. And we inaugurate the season with barbecues, beach parties, blockbuster films, and bargain hunting. But that's not how Memorial Day was envisioned by the Southern women who honored the fallen soldiers of the Civil War. Joining The Takeaway to talk about the origins of Memorial Day and how the meaning has morphed over the decades is Caroline Janney. She is an assistant professor of history at Purdue University and the author of "Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies' Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause (Civil War America)."

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