Arwa Gunja

Arwa Gunja appears in the following:

Suffering in Silence: College Kids & Suicide

Friday, December 20, 2013

Nearly half of all college students have had suicidal thoughts. Donna and Phil Satow co-founded The Jed Foundation after they tragically loss their youngest son Jed to suicide during his sophomore year of college. Misha Kessler is a recent college graduate and can speak first hand to this struggle. Together they discuss their experiences with the distress that college students face and ways people can actively get involved.

Comments [7]

"The Luminaries" Lights Up the Literary Skies

Thursday, December 19, 2013

"The Luminaries" is the fascinating new novel written by Eleanor Catton, the 2013 Man Booker Prize winner. Described by the New York Times as "doing a Charlotte Bronte-Themed crossword puzzle while playing chess and Dance Dance Revolution on a Bongo Board," the novel is wildly unique. Catton is the youngest person to win the Prize and only the second to win from New Zealand, and she joins The Takeaway to discuss the wild wave of enthusiasm for her work.

Comment

Gov. Hickenlooper's Year on the National Stage

Thursday, December 19, 2013

John Hickenlooper, Democratic Governor of Colorado, has had quite a year on the national stage. From extreme weather that caused deadly landslides, to becoming one of two states that voted to legalize marijuana, Gov. Hickenlooper has been the center for high praise and high criticism. His state has also become a political battleground, even as Hickenlooper famously campaigned to stay above the partisan fray. Hickenlooper joins us to take a look back at 2013.

Comment

The Fight to Make Science Apolitical

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Brian Cox, a leading British physicist and science broadcaster on the BBC, says scientists need to realize that if they don't step up like Galileo to argue against distortion and myth they will lose the war for truth—even if they win the battle of being correct. "We're trying to understand the natural world and the world that is out there—that has nothing to do with whether you're a Democrat or a Republican," he says. Professor Cox joins The Takeaway to explain why it is so important to make science apolitical. 

Comments [6]

Greenwald on Snowden Leaks: "Hold Me Accountable"

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Glenn Greenwald, the journalist who helped Edward Snowden break news of the NSA’s mas surveillance apparatus, has found himself in the middle one of the year’s biggest news stories. In this second half of a two-part interview with The Takeaway, Greenwald shifts his focus from national security issues to the meaning of responsible journalism. “The public will ultimately judge what it is that I do just like anybody else who’s acting in a way that affects public life, and I think that’s how it should be,” he says.

Comments [4]

Glenn Greenwald: The U.S. Is Not Safer Since 9/11

Monday, December 16, 2013

“I think what we did made the threat much, much worse, and at the same time, destroyed many of the freedoms that we’ve all been taught define what the United States is all about,” says the investigative journalist.

Comments [32]

Forget Detroit, Puerto Rico Is In Big Trouble

Monday, December 16, 2013

Though Detroit seems to be in dire straights with its recent bankruptcy filing, there might actually be another piece of America that’s even worse off: Puerto Rico. The U.S. territory is facing massive debt, a potentially crippling bond ratings cut, a gaping hole in its massive pension fund, and a towering unemployment rate bolstered by federal entitlements. Ingrid Vila, chief of staff to Puerto Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla, joins us to discuss Puerto Rico's options.

Comments [3]

The Nostalgic Road from Detroit to Tehran

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

While the world may be waiting to see how the nuclear deal between the U.S. and Iran shakes out, people in Iran's auto industry are far more anxious to see U.S. sanctions lifted and the revival of the car market. The Paykan, a homely little car, may just be a bridge between two divided nations. Shahin Armin, a seasoned expert in all things Paykan, joins The Takeaway to discuss what sanctions have done to Iran's auto industry.

Comments [6]

Bipartisan Deal Reached on Budget

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

There must be something in the water in Washington, D.C.—it's another day and another bipartisan deal has gone through. House Republicans and Senate Democrats struck a budget deal a whole 35 days before the January 15 deadline when the government would run out of money. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, breaks down what's in the deal.

Comments [2]

The Myth of Race & Its Historical Consequences

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Race is embedded the fabric of American culture, and racial categories and their implications persist today. In "A Dreadful Deceit: The Myth of Race from the Colonial Era to Obama's America," Jacqueline Jones, professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, argues against our continued use of racial categories—at least in the ways Americans have used these categories since the country's founding. 

Comments [4]

Your Takeaway: Listener Stories

Friday, November 29, 2013

Happy day-after-Thanksgiving from The Takeaway!

Today, we’re doing things a little differently. Your comments on our stories come pouring in every day, and often times you have stories of your own. So today we hear from you—and only you. The Takeaway producers have worked for over a month to curate ...

Comments [6]

'One Red Rose' Sets JFK's Assassination to Music

Monday, November 25, 2013

Composer Steven Mackey was only 7-years-old when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963. But he still has vivid memories from the tragedy, and he wrote the musical piece "One Red Rose" in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the assassination. "One Red Rose" was commissioned by Carnegie Hall, Yellow Barn, and the Nasher Center. It premiered at Carnegie Hall in February 2013 and is being performed in Dallas this weekend by The Brentano string quartet.

Comment

In Harm's Way: The Faces of Gun Violence

Monday, November 25, 2013

Since the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School nearly a year ago, more than 30,000 people in the United States have died from gunfire, according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Slate. Kathleen Horan is a reporter at WNYC Radio. She profiled 10 children killed by gunfire in New York City in the past year in an attempt to put a face, a voice and a story to these statistics. Kathleen joins us today to discuss her findings. 

Comments [3]

FCC May Lift Cell Phone Airplane Ban

Monday, November 25, 2013

The Federal Communications Commission is poised to make a decision on whether to lift the ban on cell phones in flight. Now the cell phone proposition has flight crews up in arms—and passengers aren't so sure how they feel about it, either. Barbara Peterson, senior aviation correspondent for Condé Nast Traveler, looks at the changes ahead, and what we can expect as the holiday travel season kicks off.

Comments [2]

Scientists Bewildered by Strange Sun Activity

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Every 11 years the sun switches it's magnetic poles in the culmination of it's solar cycle. We are quickly approaching this planetary event, but scientists are curious about some unusual behavior this time around. Some of the sun's activity, including the intensity of it's sunspots and the placement of it's magnetic field, are behaving in ways not seen for over a century. The Takeaway is joined by Todd Hoeksema, director of the Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford University, who explains more about this interesting event.

Comments [3]

Senator Angus King Urges Capitol Hill to Come Together

Tuesday, November 19, 2013

On Capitol Hill, Democrats and Republicans are struggling to find common ground over the budget, NSA revelations, and the Affordable Care Act. But Angus King, an Independent Senator from Maine, is trying to heal the breach by taking the middle road in partisan battles. Senator King joins The Takeaway to weigh in on how Congress should come together on the budget battle, NSA revelations, and the Affordable Care Act.

Comments [2]

Retro Report: A Look Back at the Detroit Sleeper Cell Case

Monday, November 18, 2013

This week the Retro Report documentary team looks back at the 2003 case of the Detroit Sleeper Cell. It was considered one of the most important post 9/11 terrorism cases, and it involved four men of Arab decent believed to be plotting attacks against an American airbase in Turkey and a hospital in Jordan. But a federal judge and the nation would soon learn that the men were innocent and were victims of a system eager for terrorism prosecutions. Retro Report producer Peter Klein joins The Takeaway to explain.

Comments [1]

What Do the New ACA Developments Mean?

Friday, November 15, 2013

President Barack Obama announced yesterday insurance companies can reinstate healthcare plans that were cancelled, or maintain existing plans that would otherwise have been cancelled by January 1st. But maintaining plans that would otherwise be deemed substandard could add additional complications for insurance companies. Julie Appleby, Reporter for Kaiser Health News, joins The Takeaway to break down this policy shift.

Comments [2]

In Pivot, Obama Allows Americans to Keep Canceled Policies for 1 Year

Thursday, November 14, 2013

After promises from President Barack Obama that Americans would be able to keep their health insurances plan if they like them, the president has come out to apologize for healthcare plan cancellations. The Obama Administration pivoted on Thursday, saying that states and insurers can extend current policies canceled under the new healthcare law for one year. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, is with us to explain the changes coming from the administration.

Comments [4]

Have A Criminal Record & Want A Job? Look Elsewhere.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

While it is illegal for employers to reject applicants solely because they may have a criminal record, the practice is widespread. Kai Wright, editor of Colorlines.com, recently wrote an article for The Nation called "Boxed In: How a Criminal Record Keeps You Unemployed For Life." He joins The Takeaway to discuss why our society should be interested in the employment of people with a criminal history and the positive effects it could have.

Comments [9]